Switch to Dual Emblem Display

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B3v p22]

In silentium.

Silence

III.

Cùm tacet, haud quicquam differt sapientibus amens,
Stultitiae est index linguaque voxque suae.
Ergo premat labias, digitoque silentia signet,
Et sese Pharium vertat in Harpocratem[1].

When he is silent, the fool differs no whit from the wise. It is tongue and voice that betray his stupidity. Let him therefore put his finger to his lips and so mark silence, and turn himself into Egyptian Harpocrates.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B4r p23]

Von stilschweigen.

III.

Fur witzig einen narn man schetzt
Der schweygt, und er verredt sich bald
So er bey einem weysen schwetzt,
Gleich als ein haff der ubel hald:
Darumb deinn mund beschlossen halt
Mit dem finger, und red nit vil,
Wie der got Harpocras gemalt,
Der dich solch tugent leren wil.

Notes:

1.  Harpocrates, also known as Horus, was the son of the Egyptian divinity Isis. He avenged the murder of his father Osiris by Set/Typhon. He is often represented as an infant with his finger held to his mouth as a sign of silence and economy of words. See Plutarch, De Iside et Osiride 68.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:


Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top