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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C3r p37]

PERICULUM IN TERRA, PERICULUM IN MARI. vel NUSQUAM A MALIS TUTUM.

DANGER AT SEA - DANGER ON THE LAND or NO PLACE SAFE FROM EVIL’S BLOWS.

Per mare fertur equis Pirata in nave marinis.
Bellua in orbe quibus nulla nocientior est.
In terram praedo sua monstra trifurcifer urget
Virginis ad raptum, quae fugiens fit avis.
Nam Dea de coelo spectans, miseransque Minerva
Perfugium volucrem tollit in aėrium.[1]
heu quid id est? Terra, atque mari violenta malorum
Vis furit. innocui raptibus expositi!
Nulla salus: nisi summa Dei sapientia mutet:
Faxit & ad summos usque volare polos.

A pirate on his ship is carried across the waves by hippocampi. No creature is more harmful than he! The robber with his trident fork drives his monsters landward to seize a virgin, who in her flight becomes a bird. For the goddess Minerva looks down from the sky and pities her, raising her, a bird, to aerial safety. Oh what is this? The violent force of evil folk rages on land and sea alike, and the helpless are exposed to depredation! Safety there’s none, unless perhaps the supreme wisdom of God transforms you, and makes you fly up even to heaven’s highest poles.

Notes:

1.  This is the story of the crow (cornix), who is sometimes known as Coronis or Corinis, a beautiful maiden saved from Neptune’s advances by Minerva, and later (unfairly it would seem to me) faulted by the goddess for acting ‘crow-like’, i.e. being a tattle-tale. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.550.



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