Switch to Dual Emblem Display

Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[F5r p89]

ANIMA IBI ANIMAT, UBI
AMAT.

THE SOUL LIVES WHERE IT LOVES

Demophoon[1] ventis c¨m vela, & verba dedisset,
Stabat arenoso littore Phyllis amans.
Navem rapta sequens oculis, & brachia tendens
Huc: ubi iam fugiens spiritus eius erat.
Spiritus, ac anima, hic animans ubi Phyllis amabat.
Corpus & ut vitam, vita secuta animam.
Quid mirum periit si posteÓ Phyllis amore?
Exanimum corpus vivere non poterat.

As Demophoon set his sails and words to the wind, Phyllis stood lovelorn on the sandy shore. Seduced, she follows the ship with her eyes, holding out her arms to where her spirit, now fleeing, lay. Spirit and living soul are there where Phyllis loves, and as the body follows the life, so the life follows the soul. Is is surprising that Phyllis later died of love? Her soulless body could not live.

Notes:

1. áSon of Theseus, ruled part of Attica. He was betrothed to Phyllis, daughter of the king of Thrace, but his delay in arrival caused her to hang herself and she was turned into a tree. When Demophoon arrived, he embraced the tree and buds came forth. Ovid, Ars amatoria, 3.38



Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:


Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top