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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C2v p36]

EMBLEMA XXX.

Sero detrectat onus, qui subit.

If you give in to a burden, it’s too late to give it up. [lit. Too late does he refuse a burden, who submits.]

Iugo repanda colla servili effere
Exuere molliter paras taure irrita.
Sero recusat, qui capessiit, iugum,
Connubiumque, munera & civilia.

Angry bull, you are trying weakly to rid your bent neck of the yoke of slavery, to make life easy for yourself - in vain.* Too late he refuses the yoke, who has submitted to it, - Marriage too, and civil duties.
* The sense seems clear, the grammar less so.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H3v p118]

Trimetrum Iambicum monocolon, in quo priores duo
versus reciproci sunt, qui transposita à calce dictio-
num serie transeunt in pentametros, hoc modo:

Effere servili colla repanda iugo
Irrita taure paras molliter excutere.
Nequicquam sapit & ferre recusat iu
gum, qui semel admisit: quando & elephantos ius
sa facere, & Leones iuga subire videmus, haud
temerè excutienda. Serò coniugii capistrum[1] acce-
ptum deplorat maritus, qui semel collum submi-
sit. Aërem verberat, qui publicis muneribus, quae
curanda suscepit, ingratis defungi parat. Pictura
per se clara est.

The verse-form is an iambic trimeter monocolon, the first two lines of which are reversible, so that when the order of their words is put back to front, they turn into pentameters, thus: Effere servili colla repanda iugo / Irrita taure paras molliter excutere.

In vain does a man [or beast] come to his senses and refuse to bear the yoke, when once he has submitted to it: since we see even elephants obeying orders, and lions submitting to the yoke that they cannot easily shake off. Too late does the married man complain of the halter of matrimony that he has taken on, when once he has submitted his neck to it. A man who has taken on public duties, is striking out at thin air if he tries to relieve himself of the unrewarding burden.The picture is self-explanatory.

Notes:

1.   Cf. ‘maritale capistrum’, Juvenal, Satires, 6.43.



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