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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L6v p172]

Voluptatis triumphus.

The Triumph of Pleasure.

Qui currus trahitur ceu domitis equis,
Et quo grata voluptas sedet, & penes
Illam quas comites semper habet suas,
Naturam illius innuunt.
Est duplex etenim, suavis, & improba,
Monstrat laeva manus commoda quae vehat
Haec, quae dextra ferat cernis & obviam.
Albo haec, illa nigro est equo.
Laevam vina, venus, saepe etiam dolor,
Et facti comes est quem quoque poenitet.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L7r p173]Saltantem stimulo promovet, & puer
Caecus curat equum nigrum.
Sed castae socii sunt bona publica,
Virtutes celebres, gloria, candidi
Lenti auriga, & equi concomitans honor.
Dotes appositas habent.
Tu quicunque sapis, delige dexteram,
Ac laevam fugito, praemia sunt enim
Aeterna illius, ast huius ab omnibus
Detestanda bono, & pio.

This chariot here is pulled as if by tame horses, and on it dear Pleasure sits, with, beside her, those whom she has always as her adherents. They hint at her nature. For she is double: sweet and debauched; the left hand shows the good things that she bears, and you see from the front what the right hand carries. The one on the left is pulled by a white horse, the other by a black. On the left are wine, pleasure [Venus], and often pain as well, and anyone who feels sorry for his deed is her comrade. She keeps the left-hand horse moving with her whip as it leaps, and the blind boy [Cupid] takes care of the black one. But the chaste one’s comrades are the Public Good, the famous Virtues, Glory, and the white slow horse’s attendant is Honour. They have endowments added. You, whoever you are, are wise: love the one on the right, and flee the one on the left, for the one has eternal rewards, but the other, rewards that all good and pious men should hate.



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