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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc2v f202v]

LUXURIA.

Licentiousness

Emblema. 72.

Eruca capripes redîmitus tempora Faunus
Immodicae Veneris Symbola certa refert.
Est eruca salax,[1] indexque libidinis hircus:
Et Satyri Nymphas semper amare solent.[2]

Goat-footed Faunus, his temples garlanded with the herb rocket, provides unmistakable symbols of desire without restraint. Rocket stimulates desire, the goat is a symbol of sexual appetite, and the satyrs are always lusting after the nymphs.

Notes:

1.  Rocket is described as herba salax at Ovid, Ars amatoria, 4.22. Pliny, Natural History, 10.83.182 and 19.44.154, lists it as an aphrodisiac.

2.  Satyrs were creatures half-human, half-goat in form, like Faunus, and Pan with whom Faunus was often identified. See emblems 96 ([A15a096]), and 121 ([A15a121]). Cf. Horace, Odes, 3.18.1: ‘Faunus, you who lust after the fleeing nymphs’.


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Section: LUXURIA (Licentiousness). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F1r p81]

Luxuriosorum opes.

The wealth of the dissipated.

Rupibus aëris, summique crepidine saxi
Immites fructus ficus acerba parit,
Quos corvi comedunt, quos devorat improba cornix.
Qui nihil humanae commoditatis habent.
ic [=Sic] fatuorum opibus parasiti, & scorta fruuntur:
Et nulla iustos utilitate iuvant.[1]

On towering cliffs, on the brink of the highest crag, the bitter fig-tree bears its sharp fruit. These the ravens eat, these the rascally crow devours, fruit that offers nothing of any good to man. Even so, parasites and whores enjoy the wealth of fools - decent persons get no benefit from it.

Notes:

1.  This is based on an idea in Anthologia Graeca, 12.185.


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