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SEMPER PRAESTO ESSE IN-
fortunia.

Misfortune is always at hand

Emblema 128.

Ludebant parili tres olim aetate puellae
Sortibus, ad stigias quae prior iret aquas.
At cui iactato male cesserat alea talo,
Ridebat sortis caeca puella suae:
Cum subito icta caput labente est mortua tecto,
Solvit & audacis debita fata ioci:
Rebus in adversis mala sors non fallitur: Ast in
Faustis, nec precibus, nec locus est manui.[1]

Once three girls of the same age were amusing themselves, casting lots to see which of them would be the first to go to the waters of the Styx. When the dice were cast, the throw fell out unluckily for one of them, but she laughed with blind contempt at the fate predicted for her. Then suddenly she died, struck on the head as the roof fell in, and so paid the fated penalty for her bold mockery. In misfortune, a bad omen cannot be eluded, but even in prosperity neither prayers nor action have any place.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.158.


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MALE PARTA MALE DILA-
buntur.[1]

Ill gotten, ill spent

Emblema 127

Miluus edax,[2] nimiae quem nausea torserat escae,
Hei mihi mater, ait, viscera ab ore fluunt.
Illa autem, quid fles? cur haec tua viscera credas,
Qui rapto vivens sola aliena vomis?

A voracious kite, which had eaten too much, was racked with vomiting. ‘O dear, mother’, it said, ‘entrails are pouring out of my mouth.’ She however replied: ‘What are you crying about? Why do you think these are your entrails? You live by plunder and vomit only what belongs to others.’

Notes:

1.  The title is proverbial. See Cicero, Philippics, 2.65.

2.  ‘A voracious kite’. The kite was a figure of greed and extortion.


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  • Gluttony, Intemperance, 'Gula'; 'Gola', 'Ingordigia', 'Ingordigia overo Aviditą', 'Voracitą' (Ripa) ~ personification of one of the Seven Deadly Sins [11N35] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • animal 'educating the young', playing with young [25F(+422)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • theft [44G544] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Bad, Evil, Wrong (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52B5112(+4):55A1(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Squandering, Extravagance, Prodigality, Waste; 'Prodigalitą' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [55C11(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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