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IUSTA VINDICTA.

Just recompense

Emblema 170.

Dum[1] residet Cyclops sinuosi in faucibus antri,
Haec secum teneras concinit inter oves:
Pascite vos herbas, sociis ego pascar Achivis,
Postremumque Utin viscera nostra ferent.
Audiit haec Itachus, Cyclopaque lumine cassum
Reddidit, en paenas ut suus auctor habet[2]?[3]

Sitting in the mouth of his arching cave, the Cyclops sang thus to himself amidst his gentle sheep: Do you feed on grass; I shall feed on the Greek companions, and last of all my belly shall get No-man. The man from Ithaca heard this and made the Cyclops eyeless. See how the one who plotted misfortune collects it himself!

Notes:

1.  Corrected from the Errata.

2.  A proverbial sentiment: cf. Erasmus, Adagia 3091, Di tibi dent tuam mentem.

3.  For the story of Ulysses (the man from Ithaca) in the Cyclops’ cave and his escape by blinding the Cyclops, see Homer, Odyssey 9.177 ff. Ulysses had told the Cyclops his name was No-man. (Utis l. 4).


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PAREM DELINQUENTIS ET
suasoris culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C8r]

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica victrix,
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Quîs ille excusat, quod nec sit strenuus armis,
Ullius aut saevo leserit ense latus.
Hinc[1] illi quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[2]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

Notes:

1.  Later editions have Huic.

2.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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