Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Hhh4r p855]

Salix.

The willow

EMBLEMA CCI.

Quod frugisperdam salicem vocitarit Homerus,[1]
Clitoriis homines moribus adsimilat.[2]

When Homer called the willow ‘seed-loser’, he made it like men with Clitorian habits.

Notes:

1.  Homer, Odyssey, 10.510. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.46.110: the willow drops its seed before it is absolutely ripe, and for that reason was called by Homer ‘seed-loser’.

2.  The waters of Lake Clitorius in Arcadia generated an aversion to wine in those who drank of them. See Pliny, Natural History, 31.13.16; Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.322ff. The combination of the two images here may symbolise minds and characters gone to the bad and producing nothing of value. See Erasmus, Parabolae, p. 268: “As willow-seed, shed before it ripens, is not only itself barren but when used as a drug causes barrenness in women by preventing conception, so the words of those who teach before they have truly learnt sense not only make them no better in themselves, but corrupt their audience and render it unteachable”; and p. 230: “Those who have drunk of the Clitorian Lake develop a distaste for wine, and those who have once tasted poetry reject the counsels of philosophy, or the other way round. Equally, those who gorge themselves with fashionable pleasures reject those satisfactions which are honourable and genuine.”


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

  • sobriety; 'Sobrietà', 'Astinenza' (Ripa) [31B59] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Non-procreation (+ emblematical representation of concept) [58AA2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME [61D(CLITOR)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (story of) Homer representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(HOMER)3] Search | Browse Iconclass

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N3r p197]

Le sapin.

XXXIV.

On bastit du sapin, qui croist és monts hautains,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N3v p198] Et en terre & en mer les maisons des humains.[1]

Commentaires.

Cest embleme remarque la grande utilité qu’on
tire du sapin: Car plus commodement que de toute
autre sorte de bois, on en bastit les navires & les mai-
sons: à quoy il est de tout propre, mais sur tout aux
travenaisons. On le peut aussi appliquer à ceux qui
pour l’esperance de grandes recompenses, ne font pas
difficulté de changer de condition, & d’encourir des
grands dangers: ainsi que le sapin laisse les hautes
montaignes, où il croist, pour descendre aux vallees
voire sur l’eau.

Notes:

1.  This is because it grows strong by withstanding the gales and harsh weather. Contrast Anthologia Graeca, 9.30ff, 105, and the much-translated 376 for an opposing view of the fir tree: “how can the fir, storm-tossed while growing on land, resist the gales at sea?” 9.31 was translated by Alciato (Selecta epigrammata, p. 98).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

    Relating to the text:

    Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

     

    Back to top