Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[A5r]

IN VICTORIAM DOLO
PARTAM.

On victory won by guile.

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[A5v]

Aiacis tumulum[1] ego perluo virtus,
Heu misera albentes dilacerata comas.
Scilicet hoc restabat ad huc [=adhuc] , ut iudice graeco[2],
Vincerer & causa stet potiore dolus.[3]

I, Virtue, bedew with tears the tomb of Ajax, tearing, alas, in my grief my whitening hairs. This was all it needed - that I should be worsted with a Greek as judge, and that guile should appear to have the better cause.

Notes:

1.This neither makes sense nor scans without lacrimis, cf. other editions.

2.The Greek assembly awarded the arms of the dead Achilles to the cunning and eloquent Ulysses, not the brave and straight-forward Ajax. For Ajax’ subsequent suicide, [A31a039].

3.See Anthologia graeca 7.145.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[A4v]

POTENTISSIMUS
affectus amor.

Love, the all-powerful emotion

Aspice ut invictas[1] vires auriga leonis
Expressus gemma pusio vincat amor
Utque manu hac scuticam teneat, hac flectat habenas
Utque sit in pueri plurimus ore decor[2]
Dira lues procul esto feram qui vincere talem
Est potis, ŗ nobis temperet an ne manus. [3]

Look - here’s Love the lad, carved on a gem. See how he rides triumphant in his chariot and subdues the lion’s might. How in one hand he holds a lash, with the other he guides the reins, and on his countenance rests the loveliness of youth. - Dread pestilence keep far away. Would one who has the power to conquer such a beast keep his hands from us?

Notes:

1.Later editions read invictus

2.In some editions, this sequence of subjunctives is changed to indicative.

3.This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.221, an epigram about a seal carved with a representation of Eros driving a chariot drawn by lions.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top