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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E4v]

DULCIA QUANDO-
que amara fieri.

Sweetness turns at times to bitterness

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E5r]

Matre procul licta paulum secesserat infans,
Lydius[1], hunc dirae sed rapuistis apes.
Venerat hic ad vos placidas ratus esse volucres,
Cum nec ita imitis vipera saeva foret.
Que [=Quae] datis ah dulci stimulos pro munere mellis,
Proh dolor, heu sine te gratia nulla datur.[2]

A Lydian babe had strayed some way off, leaving his mother at a distance, but you made away with him, you dreadful bees. He had come to you, thinking you harmless winged creatures, yet a merciless viper would not be as savage as you. Instead of the sweet gift of honey, ah me, you give stings. Ah pain, without you, alas, no delight is granted.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.548 , where a baby, called Hermonax, is stung to death. See also Anthologia graeca 9.302 for another epigram treating the same incident.


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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2r p227]

Savans, contre savans, ne doibvent parler.

Apostrophe.

Pourquoy prens tu la Cigale, Hirondelle
A tes petitz pour donner repast d’elle?[1]
Quand toutes deux vous estes creatures,
En lieu, temps, chant, vol, de mesmes natures.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2v p228] Laisse la donq’ Car c’est faict invident.
Les eloquens, l’ung sur l’aultre avoir dent.

Par ung vulgaire proverbe on dict: que
quand ung loup mage [=mange] l’aultre, c’est mau
vaise saison. Aussi est ce une grande vil-
lennie: quand ung homme savant, & elo-
quent, detracte d’ung aultre semblable:
Ce que entendoit Pythagoras, defendant
de recevoir l’hirondelle en sa maison.
Pource qu’elle devore la Cigale volati
le amie des Muses, & chanterelle vernal
le: elle estant de mesme qualite.

Notes:

1.  The reference is to the legend of Procne’s metamorphosis into a swallow. See [A58a064]. For swallows catching cicadas, see Aelian, De natura animalium 8.6.


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  • discussion, dialogue, dispute ~ scholar, philosopher [49C40] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Similarity, Likeness [51B2] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Eloquence; 'Eloquenza', 'Fermezza & Gravitą dell'Oratione' (Ripa) [52D3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Disagreement, Discord; 'Discordia' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54EE31(+4):51B3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Malevolence, Maliciousness; 'Malevolenza', 'Malignitą', 'Malvagitą' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57AA7(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Philomela, Procne and Tereus changed into nightingale, swallow, hoopoe (or hawk): Tereus seeks to kill Philomela and Procne for having slain his son; in their flight the two sisters are changed into a nightingale and a swallow; Tereus is changed into a ho [97DD23] Search | Browse Iconclass

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