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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E5v]

IN EUM QUI SIBI IPSI[1]
damnum apparat.

One who brings about his own downfall

Capra lupum non sponte meo nunc ubere lacto,
Quod male pastoris provida cura iubet.[2]
Creverit ille simul, mea me[3] post ubera pascet,
Improbitas nullo flectitur obsequio.[4]

I am a goat giving suck against my will - to a wolf. The improvident kindness of the shepherd makes me do this. Once the wolf has grown, after feeding at my teats, he will then eat me. Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered.

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: ‘ipsi’ omitted.

2.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.47. For the content cf. Aesop, Fables 313-5.

3.  Corrected from the Errata.

4.  ‘Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered’. See Erasmus, Adagia 1086, Ale luporum catulos.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2r p227]

Savans, contre savans, ne doibvent parler.

Apostrophe.

Pourquoy prens tu la Cigale, Hirondelle
A tes petitz pour donner repast d’elle?[1]
Quand toutes deux vous estes creatures,
En lieu, temps, chant, vol, de mesmes natures.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2v p228] Laisse la donq’ Car c’est faict invident.
Les eloquens, l’ung sur l’aultre avoir dent.

Par ung vulgaire proverbe on dict: que
quand ung loup mage [=mange] l’aultre, c’est mau
vaise saison. Aussi est ce une grande vil-
lennie: quand ung homme savant, & elo-
quent, detracte d’ung aultre semblable:
Ce que entendoit Pythagoras, defendant
de recevoir l’hirondelle en sa maison.
Pource qu’elle devore la Cigale volati
le amie des Muses, & chanterelle vernal
le: elle estant de mesme qualite.

Notes:

1.  The reference is to the legend of Procne’s metamorphosis into a swallow. See [A58a064]. For swallows catching cicadas, see Aelian, De natura animalium 8.6.


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  • discussion, dialogue, dispute ~ scholar, philosopher [49C40] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Similarity, Likeness [51B2] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Eloquence; 'Eloquenza', 'Fermezza & Gravitą dell'Oratione' (Ripa) [52D3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Disagreement, Discord; 'Discordia' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54EE31(+4):51B3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Malevolence, Maliciousness; 'Malevolenza', 'Malignitą', 'Malvagitą' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57AA7(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Philomela, Procne and Tereus changed into nightingale, swallow, hoopoe (or hawk): Tereus seeks to kill Philomela and Procne for having slain his son; in their flight the two sisters are changed into a nightingale and a swallow; Tereus is changed into a ho [97DD23] Search | Browse Iconclass

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