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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E6v]

FIDEI SYMBOLUM.

The symbol of good faith

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E7r]

Stet depictus honor tyrio velatus amictu,
Eiusque iungat nuda dextram veritas.
Sitque amor in medio castus,[1] cui tempora circum,
Rosa it, Dyones pulchrior cupidine.[2]
Constituunt haec signa fidem, reverentia honoris,
Quam fovet, alit amor, parturitque veritas.

Let Honour stand depicted, clothed in a garment of Tyrian purple, and let naked Truth hold his right hand. Between them, let chaste Love be represented, his brow garlanded with roses, but fairer than Cupid, Dione’s boy. These images constitute good faith, which the reverence due to Honour fosters, Love feeds, Truth brings to birth.

Notes:

1.  Amor...castus, ‘chaste love’ (Anteros), for which see [A31a072] and [A31a080].

2.  ‘Dione’s boy’. Strictly Dione was the mother of Venus, but was often identified in poetry with Venus herself, the mother of Cupid.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2r p227]

Savans, contre savans, ne doibvent parler.

Apostrophe.

Pourquoy prens tu la Cigale, Hirondelle
A tes petitz pour donner repast d’elle?[1]
Quand toutes deux vous estes creatures,
En lieu, temps, chant, vol, de mesmes natures.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2v p228] Laisse la donq’ Car c’est faict invident.
Les eloquens, l’ung sur l’aultre avoir dent.

Par ung vulgaire proverbe on dict: que
quand ung loup mage [=mange] l’aultre, c’est mau
vaise saison. Aussi est ce une grande vil-
lennie: quand ung homme savant, & elo-
quent, detracte d’ung aultre semblable:
Ce que entendoit Pythagoras, defendant
de recevoir l’hirondelle en sa maison.
Pource qu’elle devore la Cigale volati
le amie des Muses, & chanterelle vernal
le: elle estant de mesme qualite.

Notes:

1.  The reference is to the legend of Procne’s metamorphosis into a swallow. See [A58a064]. For swallows catching cicadas, see Aelian, De natura animalium 8.6.


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  • discussion, dialogue, dispute ~ scholar, philosopher [49C40] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Similarity, Likeness [51B2] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Eloquence; 'Eloquenza', 'Fermezza & Gravitą dell'Oratione' (Ripa) [52D3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Disagreement, Discord; 'Discordia' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54EE31(+4):51B3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Malevolence, Maliciousness; 'Malevolenza', 'Malignitą', 'Malvagitą' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57AA7(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Philomela, Procne and Tereus changed into nightingale, swallow, hoopoe (or hawk): Tereus seeks to kill Philomela and Procne for having slain his son; in their flight the two sisters are changed into a nightingale and a swallow; Tereus is changed into a ho [97DD23] Search | Browse Iconclass

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