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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D5r]

PIETAS FILIORUM IN
parentes.

Honour from children towards parents

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Per medios hosteîs patriae cum ferret ab igne,
Aeneas humeris dulce parentis onus.
Parcite dicebat, vobis sene adorea rapto,
Nulla erit, erepto sed patre summa mihi.[1]

When Aeneas was carrying the dear burden of his father on his shoulders through the midst of the enemy, out of the flames destroying his homeland, he kept saying: Spare us. Carrying off an old man will bring you no glory; but carrying my father to safety will be the greatest glory for me.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.163, a much translated epigram. It refers to the celebrated incident of Aeneas’ rescue of his old father at the sack of Troy, carrying him on his shoulders through the occupied and burning city. See Vergil, Aeneid 2.634ff.


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EMBLEMA CXXV.

Alius peccat, alius plectitur.

One sins and another is punished

Arripit ut lapidem catulus, morsuque fatigat,
Nec percussori mutua damna facit.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M7r f82r]Sic plerique sinunt veros elabier hosteis:
Et quos nulla gravat noxia, dente petunt.[1]

A puppy seizes the stone and worries it with his teeth and does not bite back at the one who threw it. Even so, most people allow the true enemy to escape and bite those who carry no burden of guilt.

Das CXXV.

Einer sündigt der ander büst.

Gleich wie ein Hund der mit eim Stein
Geworffen wirt, den Stein allein
Anfelt und beist in zorniglich
Dem der in gworffen hat thut er nicht
Also findt man deren vil
Die dHauptsächer lohnt auß dem spil
Und fallen allein diese an
So wider sie nicht habn gethan.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Aesop, Fables 235, where bees sting the wrong person. See Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari, where the ‘puppy’ comparison is quoted from Aristotle (Rhetoric 3, 4). See also Plato, Republic 5.469E.


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