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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E2v]

QUI ALTA CONTEM-
plantur cadere.

Those who contemplate the heights come to grief

Dum Turdos visco, pedica dum fallit Alaudas,
Et iactam [=iacta] altivolam figit harundo gruem
Dipsada non prudens auceps pede perculit ultrix,
Illa mala [=mali] emissum virus ab ore iacit.
Sic obit extento qui sydera respicit arcu,
Securus fati quod iacit ante pedes.[1]

While he tricks thrushes with bird-lime, larks with snares, while his speeding shaft pierces the high-flying crane, the careless bird-hunter steps on a snake; avenging the injury, it spits the darting venom from its jaws. So he dies, a man who gazes at the stars with bow at the ready, oblivious of the mishap lying before his feet.

Notes:

1.  See Anthologia graeca 7.172 and Aesop, Fables 137.


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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [i6v p140]

Aere quandoque salutem redi-
mendam.

Sometimes money must be spent to purchase safety

LXXXV.

Et pedibus segnis, tumida & propendulus alvo,
Haec tamen insidias effugit arte fiber.
Mordicus ipse sibi medicata virilia vellit
Atque abicit, sese gnarus ob illa peti.
Huius ab exemplo disces non parcere rebus,
Et vitam ut redimas, hostibus aera dare.[1]

Though slow of foot and with swollen belly hanging down, the beaver nonetheless escapes the ambush by this trick: it tears off with its teeth its testicles, which are full of a medicinal substance, and throws them aside, knowing that it is hunted for their sake. - From this creature’s example you will learn not to spare material things, and to give money to the enemy to buy your life.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [i7r p141]

COMMENTARIA.

Fiber aliąs Castor appellatur. animal est
amphibion, quod in terra & aqua vivere po-
test, caudam habet piscis, caetera ferč Canis
sunt, cuius genitalia in medicina plurimum
conducunt, & licet currendo tardus sit ob
ventrem tumidum & ad terram pendentem,
effugit tamen interdum ingeniosč venato-
rum insidias, hoc modo dentibus sibimet ge-
nitalia eripiens eaque ante conspectum prose-
cutoris proiicit, gnarus illum ob ea tantum
venari & ita evadit. Cuius exemplo discimus
aliquando divitiis non esse parcendum, sed
pro salute hostibus etiam pecunias dare, ma-
ximč expedire. Pariter in Aesopicis ha-
betur fabulis, de Castore virilia sibi
amputante, & recitat Plinius lib.
8. cap. 30. probe Aelia-
nus
lib. 13. cap. 47.
histor. Ani-
mal.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Aesop, Fables 153, where the same moral is drawn. For the information about the beaver, see Pliny, Natural History 8.47.109; Isidore, Etymologiae (Origines) 12.2.21.


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