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POTENTISSIMUS
Affectus amor.

Love, the all-powerful emotion

Aspice, ut invictas[1] vires auriga leonis,
Expressus gemma pusio vincat amor.
Utque manu hac scuticam teneat, hac flectat habenas,
Utque sit in pueri plurimus ore decor.[2]
Dira lues procul esto, feram qui vincere talem
Est potis, nobis temperet anne manus.[3]

Look - here’s Love the lad, carved on a gem. See how he rides triumphant in his chariot and subdues the lion’s might. How in one hand he holds a lash, with the other he guides the reins, and on his countenance rests the loveliness of youth. - Dread pestilence keep far away. Would one who has the power to conquer such a beast keep his hands from us?

Notes:

1. Later editions read invictus

2. In some editions, this sequence of subjunctives is changed to indicative.

3. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.221, an epigram about a seal carved with a representation of Eros driving a chariot drawn by lions.


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Nec verbo nec facto quenquam
laedendum.

Injure no-one, either by word or deed.

Assequitur, Nemesisque virum vestigia servat,
Continet & cubitum duraque fraena manu.
Ne mal quid facias, neve improba verba loquaris:
Et iubet in cunctis rebus adesse modum.[1]

Nemesis follows on and marks the tracks of men. In her hand she holds a measuring rod and harsh bridles. She bids you do nothing wrong, speak no wicked word, and commands that moderation be present in all things.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [C3r p37]

Aucun nest a blesser par faict
ou par parolle.

Nemesis suyt les pas des gens,
Tenant son coulde, & une bride:
Ou sont significatz urgens:
Car le frain a droict moyen guyde,
Voulant que ta langue soit vuyde,
De injures & motz de insolence:
Et son bras quelle tient solide,
Defend mal fait & violence.

Notes:

1. This epigram is based on Anthologia graeca 16.223-4.


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