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IN DEO LAETANDUM.

Joy is to be found in God

Aspice ut egregium[1] puerum Iovis alite pictor
Fecerit, Iliacum[2] summa per astra vehi.
Quis ne Iovem tactum puerili credat amore?
Dic haec Maeonius[3] finxerit unde senex?
Consilium mens atque dei cui gaudia praestant,
Creditur is summo raptus adesse Iovis.

See how the illustrator has shown the illustrious Trojan boy being carried through the highest heavens by the eagle of Jove. Can anyone believe that Jove felt passion for a boy? Explain how the aged poet of Maeonia came to imagine such a thing. It is the man who finds satisfaction in the counsel, wisdom and joys of God who is thought to be caught up into the presence of mighty Jove.

Notes:

1. In later editions the adjective is applied to the painter rather than Ganymede.

2. ‘The Trojan boy’, i.e. Ganymede, son of the Trojan prince, Tros, snatched away by the gods to be Jove’s cup-bearer. See Homer, Iliad 20.232ff, though the eagle is a post-Homeric addition. The Greek motto in the accompanying illustration, gannusthai medesi, means ‘to delight in counsels’, referring to a supposed etymology of the name Ganymedes, for which see Xenophon, Symposium 8.30.

3. ‘The aged poet of Maeonia’, i.e Homer. His place of activity is disputed. Chios or Smyrna is most likely - these are places in the central coastal area of Asia Minor, known as Lydia or Maeonia.


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Un ne peut rien: Deux peuvent beaucoup.

Zenal tailla double image,[1] qui semble
Diomedes, & Ulysses ensemble.[2]
L’Un vault en force, & l’autre en bon conseil.
L’un ne peut rien, sans l’autre son pareil.
Quand ilz sont joinctz: victoire est seure, en somme.
Car ou l’esprit, ou la main fault l’homme.

Force de corps ha besoing de conduycte d’esprit,
Et le bon esprit ha besoin de puissance, & adresse
de corps, pour executer grandes choses.

Notes:

1. Two unidentified busts signed by Zenas are in the Capitoline Museum in Rome. Two sculptors of the second, or third century AD, possibly father and son, are known by this name.

2. Odysseus and Diomedes collaborated in a successful night raid raid into Troy, for which see Homer, Iliad 10.218ff. See further Erasmus, Adagia 2051, ‘Duobus pariter euntibus’. (This title translates Iliad 10.224, a line which appears in Greek in the woodcut)


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