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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [D2v p52]

Princeps subditorum incolumitatem
procurans.

The Prince caring for the safety of his subjects

Titanii[1] quoties conturbant aequora fratres,
Tum miseros nautas anchora iacta iuvat.
Hanc pius erga homines Delphin[2] complectitur imis,
Tutis ut possit figier illa vadis.
Qum decet haec memores gestare insignia Reges,
Anchora quod nautis, se populo esse suo.

Whenever the brothers of Titan race churn up the seas, then the dropped anchor aids the wretched sailors. The dolphin that cares for man wraps itself round the anchor so that it may grip more securely at the bottom of the sea. - How appropriate it is for kings to bear this symbol, mindful that what the anchor is to sailors, they are to their people.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [D3r p53]

Prince procurant la saulvete
de ses subjectz.

Quand les ventz font effort sur Mer,
Moyennant lancre on rompt leurs cours:
Le Daulphin qui veult lhomme aymer,
Lembrasse pour donner secours.
Ceste figure en son discours,
Monstre, qung roy portant le sceptre,
Doibt estre au peuple tel recours,
Que Lancre aux mariniers scait estre.

Notes:

1. ‘The brothers of Titan race’, i.e. the winds: Aurora, daughter of the Titan Hyperion, was the mother of the West, North and South winds. See Hesiod, Theogony 378-80.

2. The dolphin was supposed to guide the anchor to a good resting place. It was always friendly to man ([A39a011]). In general, see Erasmus, Adagia 1001, Festina lente.


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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [D3v p54]

Mutuum auxilium.

Mutual help

Loripedem sublatum humeris fert lumine captus,
Et socii haec oculis munera retribuit.
Quo caret alteruter, concors sic praestat uterque:
Mutuat hic oculos, mutuat ille pedes.[1]

A man deprived of sight carries on his shoulders one with deformed feet and offers this service in return for the use of his companion’s eyes. So each of them by mutual consent supplies what the other lacks. One borrows eyes, the other feet.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [D4r p55]

Confort mutuel.

Fortune a ung lalleure osta,
Et a ung aultre les deux yeulx:
Mais leur mal elle conforta,
Par bon moyen & gratieux:
Car celluy qui fut chassieux,
Le boiteux pour guyde portoit:
Ainsi le deffault vitieux
Lung envers laultre supportoit.
Aultrement[2]
Ung paovre impotent & goutteux,
Neust sceu dung lieu se transporter:
Et laveugle nest point boiteux,
Mais il ne scait quel part troter:
Lors se feist le boiteux porter,
Qui laveugle en chemin mectoit:
Laultre qui scait ses dictz notter,
Ses deux piedz pour les yeulx prestoit.

Notes:

1. This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.12.

2. In the 1536 edition, the two verses are run together as one.


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