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Concordia.

Concord

In bellum civile duces cm Roma pararet,
Viribus & caderet Martia terra[1] suis,[2]
Mox [=Mos] fuit in partes turmis countibus hasdem,
Coniunctas dextras[3] mutua dona dari.
Foederis haec species, id habet Concordia signum,
Ut quos iungit amor, iungat & ipsa manus.

When Rome was marshalling her generals to fight in civil war and that martial land was being destroyed by her own might, it was the custom for squadrons coming together on the same side to exchange joined right hands as gifts. This is a token of alliance; concord has this for a sign - those whom affection joins the hand joins also.

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Concorde.

Pour la paix faire & casser guerre,
Les anciens touchoient aux mains:
Et navoient pour serment aultre arre,
Les capitaines des Romains.
Ce signe feist les cueurs humains,
Et joignoit la main les concordes:
Ores tel signe nest ferme, ains,
Lon rompt bien du serment les cordes.

Notes:

1. ‘Martial land’, a reference not only to Rome’s bellicose history but to the legend that Rome’s founder Romulus was the son of Mars, the god of war.

2. Cf. Horace, Epodes 16.2, ‘Rome is being destroyed by her own might’ (written during the civil conflicts of 41 BC).

3. These were fashioned in some kind of metal for use as tokens of friendship; see e.g. Tacitus, The Histories 1.54 and 2.8, (referring to another time of civil conflict, 69 - 70 AD). Alciato worked on the text of Tacitus and wrote some annotations.


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Princeps subditorum incolumitatem
procurans.

The Prince caring for the safety of his subjects

Titanii[1] quoties conturbant aequora fratres,
Tum miseros nautas anchora iacta iuvat.
Hanc pius erga homines Delphin[2] complectitur imis,
Tutis ut possit figier illa vadis.
Qum decet haec memores gestare insignia Reges,
Anchora quod nautis, se populo esse suo.

Whenever the brothers of Titan race churn up the seas, then the dropped anchor aids the wretched sailors. The dolphin that cares for man wraps itself round the anchor so that it may grip more securely at the bottom of the sea. - How appropriate it is for kings to bear this symbol, mindful that what the anchor is to sailors, they are to their people.

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Prince procurant la saulvete
de ses subjectz.

Quand les ventz font effort sur Mer,
Moyennant lancre on rompt leurs cours:
Le Daulphin qui veult lhomme aymer,
Lembrasse pour donner secours.
Ceste figure en son discours,
Monstre, qung roy portant le sceptre,
Doibt estre au peuple tel recours,
Que Lancre aux mariniers scait estre.

Notes:

1. ‘The brothers of Titan race’, i.e. the winds: Aurora, daughter of the Titan Hyperion, was the mother of the West, North and South winds. See Hesiod, Theogony 378-80.

2. The dolphin was supposed to guide the anchor to a good resting place. It was always friendly to man ([A39a011]). In general, see Erasmus, Adagia 1001, Festina lente.


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