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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K5v p154]

In studiosum captum Amore.

A scholar in the toils of love

LXXI.

Immersus studiis, dicundo & iure peritus,
Et maximus libellio,
Heliodoran[1] amat, quantum nec Thracius unquam
Princeps sororis pellicem.[2]
Pallada cur alio superasti iudice Cypri?
Num sat sub Ida est vincere?[3]

This man immersed in learning, this expert in expounding the law, this great bookman, loves Heliadora more passionately than the Thracian king ever desired the woman whom he took in her sister’s place. - Cyprian goddess, why have you defeated Pallas again with another man as judge? Isn’t it enough to have conquered on the slopes of Ida?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K6r p155]

L’estudiant espris d’amour.

LXXI.

Ung scavant homme en toute letre,
Estant a Pallas desdie,
Va son cueur en folle amour mettre,
Et ny a l’on remedie.
Venus c’est [=s’est] trop estudie,
Pour vaincre encor Pallas ung cop.
Paris en fust attedie,
C’est asses, voire c’est beaucop.

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: Helianiran. ‘Heliodora’; cf. a poem written to her by Philodemus in Anthologia graeca 5.155.

2.  ‘the Thracian king’, a reference to the story of Tereus who lusted after his wife’s sister. See [A50a070] notes.

3.  sub Ida, ‘on the slopes of Ida’, a reference to the ‘judgement of Paris’, when Paris, a shepherd on Mount Ida in Asia Minor, was chosen to arbitrate in a contest of beauty and awarded the ‘apple of beauty’ or ‘discord’ to Venus (the Cyprian goddess), who thus defeated the other two contenders, Hera (the queen of the gods) and Pallas Athene (goddess of learning).


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M6v f81v]

EMBLEMA CXXV.

Alius peccat, alius plectitur.

One sins and another is punished

Arripit ut lapidem catulus, morsuque fatigat,
Nec percussori mutua damna facit.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M7r f82r]Sic plerique sinunt veros elabier hosteis:
Et quos nulla gravat noxia, dente petunt.[1]

A puppy seizes the stone and worries it with his teeth and does not bite back at the one who threw it. Even so, most people allow the true enemy to escape and bite those who carry no burden of guilt.

Das CXXV.

Einer sündigt der ander büst.

Gleich wie ein Hund der mit eim Stein
Geworffen wirt, den Stein allein
Anfelt und beist in zorniglich
Dem der in gworffen hat thut er nicht
Also findt man deren vil
Die dHauptsächer lohnt auß dem spil
Und fallen allein diese an
So wider sie nicht habn gethan.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Aesop, Fables 235, where bees sting the wrong person. See Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari, where the ‘puppy’ comparison is quoted from Aristotle (Rhetoric 3, 4). See also Plato, Republic 5.469E.


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