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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B3v p22]

In silentium.

Silence

III.

Cųm tacet, haud quicquam differt sapientibus amens,
Stultitiae est index linguaque voxque suae.
Ergo premat labias, digitoque silentia signet,
Et sese Pharium vertat in Harpocratem[1].

When he is silent, the fool differs no whit from the wise. It is tongue and voice that betray his stupidity. Let him therefore put his finger to his lips and so mark silence, and turn himself into Egyptian Harpocrates.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B4r p23]

Von stilschweigen.

III.

Fur witzig einen narn man schetzt
Der schweygt, und er verredt sich bald
So er bey einem weysen schwetzt,
Gleich als ein haff der ubel hald:
Darumb deinn mund beschlossen halt
Mit dem finger, und red nit vil,
Wie der got Harpocras gemalt,
Der dich solch tugent leren wil.

Notes:

1.  Harpocrates, also known as Horus, was the son of the Egyptian divinity Isis. He avenged the murder of his father Osiris by Set/Typhon. He is often represented as an infant with his finger held to his mouth as a sign of silence and economy of words. See Plutarch, De Iside et Osiride 68.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B4v p24]

Etiam ferocissimos domari.

Even the fiercest are tamed.

IIII.

Romanum postquām eloquium, Cicerone perempto,
Perdiderat[1] patriae pestis acerba suae:
Inscendit currus victor, iunxitque leones[2],
Compulit & durum colla subire iugum,
Magnanimos cessisse suis Antonius armis,
Ambage hac cupiens significare duces.

After Antony, that grievous bane of his country, had destroyed eloquence by slaying Cicero, he mounted his chariot in triumph and yoked to it lions, forcing their necks to bow to the harsh yoke, desiring by this symbolic act to indicate that great leaders had given way before his military might.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B5r p25]

Zamung der gar fraydigen.

IIII.

Als Antony het erschlagen
Cicero den beredten man,
Setzt er sich auff einen wagen,
Und spannet fraydig Lewen dran.
Wolt mit der hochfart zaygen an,
Gleich wie er die Lewen gezambt,
Also het er manch grossen man
Zu Rhom mit seinem gwalt gedambt.

Notes:

1.  ‘had destroyed eloquence by slaying Cicero’. Cicero was considered Rome’s greatest orator - his name was held by many to be synonymous with eloquence itself; see Quintilian, Institutio oratoria 10.1.112. Mark Antony had Cicero murdered in 43 BC in revenge for his scathing attacks in the fourteen ‘Philippic’ orations. See Seneca the Elder, Suasoriae 6.17.

2.  Cf. Pliny, Natural History 8.21.55: Antony was the first to yoke lions to a chariot in Rome...by this unnatural sight giving people to understand that noble spirits were at that time bowing to the yoke.


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