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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H1v p114]

In facilè à virtute desciscentes.

Easily deflected from the right course

XLIX.

Parva velut limax Remora spreto[1] impete venti,
Remorumque, ratem sistere sola potest.
Sic quosdam ingenio & virtute ad sydera vectos,
Detinet in medio tramite causa levis.
Anxia lis veluti est, vel qui meretricius ardor
Egregiis iuvenes sevocat à studiis.[2]

Just as the little slug, the remora, scorning the impetus of wind and oars, can by itself stop a ship from moving, so some trivial reason holds back in mid-course people who through intellect and ability are on their way to the stars: for example, a worrying law-suit, or that desire for whores which entices young men away from their good studies.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H2r p115]

Wider die so leichtlich von tu-
gent abfallen.

XLIX.

Wie das fischle Remora gnent
In Latein, offt ein schiff erfast
So starck, das es sich mindert wennt,
Wie hart der wind inn segel blast:
Also mancher durch klainen last,
Als buelschafft, oder sach vor gricht,
Kunst, witz, und tugent gar verlast,
Und was er glernt wird gar zu nicht.

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: ‘spreto Remora’.

2.  [A42b052] notes, Cf. Erasmus, Parabolae pp.231, 253.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C7v]

PAREM DELINQUENTIS ET
suasoris culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C8r]

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica victrix,
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Queîs ille excusat, quod nec sit strenuus armis.
Ullius aut saevo leserit ense latus.
Hinc[1] illi quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[2]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

Notes:

1.  Later editions have Huic.

2.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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