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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I1v p130]

Cum larvis non luctandum.[1]

Do not wrestle with the dead

LVII.

Aeacidae[2] moriens percussu cuspidis Hector[3],
Qui toties hosteis vicerat ant่ suos,
Comprimere haud potuit vocem insultantibus illis,
Dum curru & pedibus nectere vincla parant.
Distrahite ut libitum est: sic cassi luce leonis
Convellunt barbam vel timidi lepores.[4]

When he was dying from the wound dealt by the spear of Aeacus’ descendant, Hector, who had so often before defeated his own enemies, could not keep silent as they triumphed over him, while preparing to tie the ropes to chariot and feet. Tear me as you will, he said; when the lion is deprived of the light of life, even cowardly hares pluck his beard.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I2r p131]

Mit todten ist nit zu fechten.

LVII.

Hector der sighafft toedlich wund
Durch seines feinds Achillis hand,
Sagt noch zu letst aus freyem mund,
Als im anlegten spoetlich band
Die Griechen: Volbringt ewern thand
Nach lust, in zager hasen art,
Die umb ein todten Lewen standt,
Zopffen im hie und dort den part.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2.  ‘of Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. ‘of Achilles’. Textual variant: Aeacidae.

3.  Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

4.  The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D1v]

IN DEPRENSUM.

Caught!

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D2r]

Iam dudum quacunque fugis te persequor at nunc
Cassibus in nostris denique captus ades.
Amplius haud poteris vires eludere nostras,
Ficulno anguillam strinximus in folio.[1]

For a long time now I have been pursuing you wherever you flee; but now you are here, at long last caught in our net. You will no longer be able to elude our power - we have gripped the eel tight in a fig-leaf.

Notes:

1.  The rough surface of the fig-leaf made it suitable for gripping slippery objects. See Erasmus, Adagia 395, Folio ficulno tenes anguillam.


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