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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O5v p218]

Ei qui semel sua prodegerit, aliena credi
non oportere.

Others’ property should not be entrusted to a person who has once squandered his own

XCVIII.

Colchidos in gremio nidum quid congeris? eheu
Nescia cur pullos tam malè credis avis.
Dira parens Medaea suos saevissima natos
Perdidit, & speras parcat ut illa tuis?[1]

Why do you build your nest in the bosom of the woman from Colchis? Alas, ignorant bird, why do you entrust your nestlings so mistakenly? That frightful mother, Medea, in her savagery slew her own children. Do you expect her to spare yours?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O6r p219]

Wer das sein verthuet, solle man
frembdes nit befelhen.

XCVIII.

O voegle wie yrrst dich so groß,
Das du so in gefarlich huet,
Nemlich in der Medaea schoß
Legst und vertrawst dein junge bruet,
So sy befleckt ier greulich hennd
In yrer aygen kinder bluet:
Traw dem nicht, der das sein verschwend.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.346, a much-translated epigram, on the subject of a swallow that built her nest on a representation of Medea. Colchidos, ‘of the woman from Colchis’, refers to Medea, from Colchis on the Black Sea, who slew her children by Jason, leader of the Argonauts, to avenge his unfaithfulness. See further [A42b033].


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  • Squandering, Extravagance, Prodigality, Waste; 'Prodigalit�' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [55C11(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Misplaced Trust, False Confidence, 'Pax Falsa'; 'Speranza fallace' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56D29(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Section: LA REPUBLICQUE. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M4v p184]

Salut publicque.[1]

Aisculape[2] est sur les autelz perché,
Soubz ung cruel serpent, doulx Dieu caché:
Malades vont vers luy faire oraison,
Il leur faict signe, & donne guerison.

Aisculape souverain medicin, filz de Apollon inventeur
de Medicine, estimé Dieu de Medicine, Fut par une grande pe-
stilence transporté d’Epidaure (qui est Albanie) à Romme, en
guise d’ung serpent grand, & privé, sans mal faire: à la venue
duquel la Pestilence cessa, & tous malades furent gueriz. Par-
quoy par luy est signifié salut public. Ce que plus tost & mieulx
pourroit estre dict, du serpent d’erain, pendu par Moses au de-
sert, le regard duquel guerissoit ceulx qui estoient morts des
serpens enflamméz, prefigurant Jesuchrist pendu en croix. Le
vray Aisculape des ames.

Notes:

1.  In the 1549 French edition, this emblem has no woodcut.

2.  Aesculapius, son of Phoebus [Apollo] and god of medicine and healing. His main sanctuary and centre of healing was near Epidaurus in Greece. The god’s epiphany and symbol was a snake, and a number of sacred snakes were kept at the sanctuary. One of these was brought to Rome in 293 BC in hopes of stopping an outbreak of plague. The snake made its home on the Island in the Tiber, where a shrine and medical centre was subsequently built. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.626ff.


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