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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C5v f21v]

Hedera.

Ivy

Haudquaquam arescens hederae est arbuscula, Cisso[1]
Quae puero Bacchum dona dedisse ferunt:
Errabunda, procax, auratis fulva corymbis,
Exterius viridis, caetera pallor habet.
Hinc aptis vates cingunt sua tempora sertis:[2]
Pallescunt studiis, laus diuturna viret.

There is a bushy plant which never withers, the ivy which Bacchus, they say, gave as a gift to the boy Cissos. It goes where it will, uncontrollable; tawny where the golden berry-clusters hang; green on the outside but pale everywhere else. Poets use it to wreathe their brows with garlands that fit them well - poets are pale with study, but their praise remains green for ever.

Notes:

1.  Κισσός is the Greek word for ‘ivy’. For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

2.  vates cingunt sua tempora, ‘Poets use it to wreathe their brows’. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [S2r f125r]

EMBLEMA CXCIX [=198] .

Terminus.

Terminus

Quadratum infoditur firmissima tessera saxum,
Stat cirrata super pectore imago tenus,
Et sese nulli profitetur cedere, talis
Terminus est,[1] homines qui scopus unus agit.
Est immota dies, praefixaque tempora fatis
Deque ferunt primis ultima iudicium.[2]

A squared stone is set in the ground, an unshakable cube, and on it stands a curly-headed image, fashioned down to the chest. This declares that it yields to none. Such is Terminus, the one and only goal that governs men. There is an immovable day, times predetermined by fate, and the last times pronounce judgement on the first.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [S2v f125v]

Das CXCIX [=198] .

Laack. Termin .[3]

Ein vierecketer grosser Stein
Ein gwiß fest Lack wirt graben ein
Darauff ghauwen biß uber dbrust
Ein Bild steht, gmacht artlich mit lust
Und spricht, Ich niemand weichen wil
Also ist der Termin und zil
Welcher die Menschen allein treibt
Und keiner vor im sicher bleibt
Der tag und zeit von Gott bestimpt
Unbeweglich alles hinnimpt
Und felt vom ersten das urtheil
Das letst so kompt hernach mit eil.

Notes:

1.  For Terminus, the unyielding boundary stone, see Livy, 1.55. Terminus and the motto Concedo nulli (line 3) were adopted by Erasmus as his personal emblem. See Erasmus, Epistulae, 1092 (CWE Correspondence, vol. 7).

2.  See Emblem 54, note to line 11 ([A67a054]).

3.  The German in certain parts of this emblem is particularly puzzling.


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