Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C7r f23r]

Populus alba.

The white poplar

Herculeos crines bicolor quòd populus ornet,[1]
Temporis alternat noxque diesque vices.[2]

The two-coloured poplar wreathes the locks of Hercules - and so its dark and light show time’s alternating changes.

Notes:

1.  The white poplar was dedicated to Hercules. According to Pausanias, Periegesis, 5.14.2, Hercules introduced it to Greece. According to another story, Hercules on his way back from the Underworld garlanded his head with stems from a white poplar growing beside the Acheron, a memorial of the nymph Leuke (White) carried off by Pluto.

2.  noxque diesque, ‘its dark and light’ (lit. night and day), a reference to the dark green surface and white underside of the white poplar leaf. According to Pliny, Natural History, 16.36.87, the leaves of the white poplar turn over at the summer solstice. Hercules was equated with the sun: Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.20.6 and 10.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q6r p251]

Le saulx.

Le Saulx fruyct perd, nomme Homere divin,[1]
Notant ceulx la qui point ne beuvent vin.

Homere souverain Poëte, ha par propre epithete appellé
le Saulx fruyct perd, pource qu’il ne porte point de fruyct,
& croist en l’eau, ou pres de l’eau. Par cela signifiant, que
les beuveurs d’eau sont infructueux de corps, ou d’esprit:
mesme que la semence du Saulx faict perdre chaleur na-
turelle, & puissance d’engendrer.

Notes:

1.  Homer, Odyssey, 10.510. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.46.110: the willow drops its seed before it is absolutely ripe, and for that reason was called by Homer ‘seed-loser’.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top