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In sordidos.

Disgusting people

Quae rostro clystere velut sibi proluit aluum
Ibis, Niliacis cognita littoribus,[1]
Transiit opprobrii in nomen, quo Publius hostem
Naso suum appellat, Battiadesque suum. [2]

The ibis, a bird familiar on the banks of the Nile, washes out its bowels using its beak like a syringe. ‘Ibis’ has become a term of insult. Publius Naso [Ovid] called his enemy Ibis; and the inhabitant of Battus’ town did the same.

Notes:

1. For this information about the ibis, see Aelian, De natura animalium, 2.35; Cicero, De natura deorum, 2.126; Pliny, Natural History, 8.41.97.

2. Battiades, ‘the inhabitant of Battus’ town’, i.e. the poet Callimachus, a native of Cyrene, a town founded by Battus. Ovid refers to Callimachus’ invective (not now extant) in his own poem Ibis, 53ff.


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  • enema, squirt (+ variant) [49G331(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Impurity (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57AA63(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Insult; 'Ingiuria', 'Offesa' (Ripa) [57BB22] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(EGYPT)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(NILE)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(CALLIMACHUS)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (story of) Ovid representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(OVID)3] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Amor filiorum.

Love of one’s children

EMBLEMA CXCIII.

Ante diem vernam boreali cana palumbes
Frigore nidificat, praecoqua & ova fovet:
Mollius & pulli ut iaceant, sibi vellicat alas,
Queis nuda hiberno deficit ipsa gelu.[1]
Ecquid Colchi pudet, vel te Progne improba? mortem
Cm volucris propriae prolis amore subit?[2]

Before the day of spring, the wood-pigeon, all white with winter snow, builds her nest and cherishes her premature eggs. To make her chicks lie more softly, she plucks her own wing-feathers, and stripped of them, she herself perishes from the wintry frost. Woman of Colchis, do you feel any shame? Or you, heartless Procne? - when a bird submits to death out of love for her own off-spring.

Notes:

1. This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.95.

2. Both Medea (the woman of Colchis) and Procne killed their own children. They are the legendary infamous child-killers. See [A91a070] n. for Procne, [A91a054] n. for Medea.


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