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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H4v p120]

Que por pequeño que sea el amor da gran
pena. De Theochrito.[1]

RHIMA MEDIA.

La dulce miel el tierno Amor cogiendo
En el dedo mordiendo:le una abeja
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H5r p121] El aguijon le dexa: y el cuytado
Sopla su dedo inchado: y pateando
La tierra, està mostrando: la picada
A Venus, que enojada: mire quales
Herydas tan mortales: le ha causado
Aquel tan laçerado: animalejo.
La Venus con consejo: sonriendo
Acallale diciendo: Mi hijo calla,
Que no puedes culpalla: pues tu imitas
A aquestas aveçitas: que aun chiquito
Das de dolor heridas infinito.

Notes:

1.  3rd-century BC bucolic poet, who may or may not have written the Idylls (19, The Honey Stealer), on which this is based.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E4r]

IN ADULATORES.

Flatterers

De Chameleonte vide Plinium naturalis historia
libro. VIII. Cap. XXXIII.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E4v]

Semper hiat, semper tenuem qua vescitur auram[1],
Reciprocat chamaeleon[2].
Et mutat faciem varios sumitque colores,
Praeter rubrum vel candidum.[3]
Sic & adulator populari vescitur aura,[4]
Hiansque cuncta devorat.
Et solum mores imitatur principis atros.
Albi & pudici nescius.

The Chameleon is always breathing in and out with open mouth the bodiless air on which it feeds; it changes its appearance and takes on various colours, except for red and white. - Even so the flatterer feeds on the wind of popular approval and gulps down all with open mouth. He imitates only the black features of the prince, knowing nothing of the white and pure.

Notes:

1.  Corrected from the Errata and by hand in this copy.

2.  This creature was supposed to feed only on air, keeping its mouth wide open to suck it in. See Pliny, Natural History 8.51.122. For the chameleon cf. Erasmus, Parabolae pp.144, 241, 252.

3.  ‘except for red and white’. See Pliny, ib.

4.  ‘the wind of popular approval’. This is a common metaphor in Latin, e.g. Horace, Odes 3.2.20, ‘at the behest of the wind of popular approval.’


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