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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M6v p188]

El Laurel.

TERCETO.

Adivina el Laurel lo venidero,
Y trae señales de salud muy ciertas,
Y con polvo haze el sueño verdadero.[1]

TERCETO DEL MISMO.

Una corona de Laurel se deve
A Carlos Quinto, que la vittoriosa
Frente gran razon es que tal la lleve.

Notes:

1.  The laurel was sacred to Apollo, god of prophecy. The priestess of Apollo at Delphi induced a prophetic trance by chewing laurel leaves. Prophecies were sometimes written on laurel leaves. If laurel leaves crackle when thrown into the flames, happiness is portended.


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  • pillow [41A7632] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • crowning the victor with laurel [45I6110] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Prediction, Prophecy; 'Augurio', 'Divinatione', 'Profetia' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52E2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Protection; 'Custodia', 'Difesa contra nimici, malefici & venefici', 'Difesa contra pericoli', 'Riparo da i tradimenti' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54E42(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • historical person (with NAME) other representations to which the NAME of a historical person may be attached (with NAME of person) [61B2(CHARLES V [of Holy Roman Empire])3] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [S6r f129r]

EMBLEMA CCXIII [=208] .

Abies.

The fir tree

Apta fretis abies in montibus editur altis,
Est & in adversis maxima commoditas.[1]

The fir tree that is fit to sail the sea grows high up on the hills. Even in hard circumstances, there is great advantage to be found.

Das CCXIII [=208] .

Dannenbaum.

Die Dannen wirt auff das Meer braucht
Und wechst in den hohen Bergen rauch
Also ist vil nutz und vil glück
In der widerwertigkeit tück.

Notes:

1.  This is because it grows strong by withstanding the gales and harsh weather. Contrast Anthologia Graeca, 9.30ff, 105, and the much-translated 376 for an opposing view of the fir tree: “how can the fir, storm-tossed while growing on land, resist the gales at sea?” 9.31 was translated by Alciato (Selecta epigrammata, p. 98).


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