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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N1r p193]

La Yedra.

Ottava rhima.

Dizen que Bacco diò à el Cisso infante
La siempre verde yedra por corona.[1]
De donde con guirnalda semejante
Se adorna el morador d’el Helicona.[2]  [M]
Es verde por de fuera su semblante,
Y en lo demas la amarillez la abona,[3]
Como a’l que en los estudios se envejeçe,
De do siempre su fama reverdeçe.

[Marginalia - link to text]El poeta.

Notes:

1.  For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

2.  This full-stop is editorial.

3.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n4v p200]

Cotonea.

The quince

XXXVI.

Poma novis tribui debere cydonia nuptis
Dicitur antiquus constituisse Solon.[1]
Grata ori & stomacho cum sint, ut & halitus illis
Sit suavis, blandus manet & ore lepos.

Solon of old is said to have ordained that quinces be given to newly-weds, since these are pleasant both to mouth and stomach. As a result their breath is sweet, and winning grace drops from their lips.

Notes:

1.  antiquus...Solon, ‘Solon of old’. See Plutarch, Coniugalia praecepta, Moralia 138 D.


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