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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P7r p237]

Ni çera tras oydo.

Ottava rhima.

Aun este mal despues de tantos males
Para rehazer la chaça, nos restava?
Que la langosta nuestros sementales
Campos nos destruyesse hasta una hava.[1]
No fueron tan copiosos los reales
De Atylas ni de Xerxes,[2] qual bolava
La langosta del Euro acarreada.  [M]
Nuestra esperança en voto està trocada.

[Marginalia - link to text]D’el Solano viento.

Notes:

1.  Referring to a plague of locusts in North Italy in 1541/2.

2.  Attila the Hun and Xerxes, King of Persia, were leaders who invaded the Roman Empire and Greece with vast armies in mid fifth century AD and 480 BC respectively. Xerxes’ invasion and Attila’s first invasion both came from the east.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N2v f85v]

EMBLEMA CXXXI.

Inanis impetus.

Antagonism that achieves nothing

Lunarum [=Lunarem] noctu (ut speculum)[1] canis inspicit orbem:
Seque videns, alium credit inesse canem,[2]
Et latrat: sed frustra agitur vox irrita ventis,
Et peragit cursus surda Diana suos.[3]

A dog at night is looking into the moon’s disk as into a mirror and seeing himself, thinks there is another dog there; and he barks - but the sound is carried away, ineffectual, on the winds. Diana, unhearing, pursues her course.

Das CXXXI.

Vergebne mühe.

Als den Mon sach der Hund zu nacht
Und sich drinn als im Spiegel gdacht
Er es wer eins anderß Hunds Bild
Sprang ubersich und stalt sich wild
Aber sein bellen gieng in lufft
War vergebens und gar ein dufft
Der Mon dannoch sein lauff verricht
Last in bellen als ghör ers nicht.

Notes:

1.  For the theory of the moon’s disk as a mirror reflecting things on earth, see Plutarch, De facie in orbe lunae, Moralia, 920ff.

2.  Variant reading: altum credit inesse canem, ‘thinks there is a dog up there’.

3.  Diana is of course goddess of the moon.


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