Single Emblem View

Section: IUSTITIA (Justice). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [C3r p37]

Gratiam referendam.

Show gratitude

Ario insignis pietate Ciconia nido,
Investes pullos pignora grata fovet.
Taliaque expectat sibi munera mutua reddi,
Auxilio hoc quoties mater egebit anus.
Nec pia spem soboles fallit, sed fessa parentum
Corpora fert humeris, praestat & ore cibos.[1]

The stork, famed for its dutiful care, in its airy nest cherishes its featherless chicks, its dear pledges of love. The mother bird expects that the same kind of service will be shown her in return, whenever she needs such help in her old age. Nor does the dutiful brood disappoint this hope, but bears its parents’ weary bodies on its wings and offers food with its beak.

Notes:

1. See Pliny, Natural History 10.32.63: cranes care for their parents’ old age in their turn. See also Aelian, De natura animalium 3.23.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [H5v p122]

In astrologos.

Against astrologers

LIII.

Icare per superos qui raptus & ara, donec
In mare praecipitem cera liquata daret.[1]
Nunc te cera eadem fervensque resuscitat ignis,[2]
Exemplo ut doceas dogmata certa tuo.
Astrologus caveat quicquam praedicere, praeceps
Nam cadet impostor dum super astra vehit[3].

Icarus, you were carried through the heights of heaven and through the air, until the melted wax cast you headlong into the sea. Now the same wax and the burning fire raise you up again, so that by your example you may provide sure teaching. Let the astrologer beware of prediction. Headlong will the imposter fall, as he flies beyond the stars.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [H6r p123]

Wider die sternseher.

LIII.

Als Icarus seinn flug erschwang
Zu hoch, wider seins vaters ler,
Bald im durch das gwichst gfider drang
Die Sonn, und schlueg in inn das meer:
Da gschicht wol zu bedencken wer
Eimm sternseher, das er seinn mund
In den himel setzt nit zu fer,
Zu hoch gestelt ist nimmer gsund.

Notes:

1. Cf. Anthologia graeca 16.107, a poem on a bronze statue of Icarus, translated by Alciato at Selecta epigrammata (Cornarius, ed.) p.333. Icarus and his father Daedalus ([A42b008] notes) escaped from King Minos of Crete on wings of feathers and wax. Icarus was over-bold and flew too near the sun; when his wings melted, he crashed into the Icarian Sea and was drowned. See Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.183ff. Icarus, like Phaethon ([A42b064]) was a type of those who do not keep to their proper station.

2. ‘same wax...fire’: a reference to the cire perdue method of casting statues.

3. Textual variant: ‘volat’


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions