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Section: MORS (Death). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L5v p170]

Terminus.

Terminus

Quadratum infoditur firmissima tessera saxum,
Stat cirrata super pectore imago tenus,
Et sese nulli profitetur cedere, talis
Terminus est,[1] homines qui scopus unus agit.
Est immota dies, praefixaque tempora fatis,
Deque ferunt primis ultima iudicium.[2]

A squared stone is set in the ground, an unshakable cube, and on it stands a curly-headed image, fashioned down to the chest. This declares that it yields to none. Such is Terminus, the one and only goal that governs men. There is an immovable day, times predetermined by fate, and the last times pronounce judgement on the first.

Notes:

1.  For Terminus, the unyielding boundary stone, see Livy, 1.55. Terminus and the motto Concedo nulli (line 3) were adopted by Erasmus as his personal emblem. See Erasmus, Epistulae, 1092 (CWE Correspondence, vol. 7).

2.  See Emblem 186 ([A50a186]).


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [A5v]

REVERENTIAM IN MATRIMO
NIO REQUIRI .

Respect is required in marriage

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [aA6r]

Cum furit in Venerem, pelagi se in littore sistit,
Vipera, & ab stomacho dira venena vomit.
Murenamque ciens ingentia sybila tollit,
At subito amplexus appetit illa viri.[1]
Maxima debetur thalamo reverentia, coniunx,
Alterum debet coniugi & obsequium.

When the viper is sexually aroused, it stations itself on the seashore and ejects the dread poisons from its gut. To summon the moray eel, it raises a loud hissing, and suddenly she comes to the embrace of her mate. - Great reverence is owed to the marriage bed, and the partners owe each other mutual respect.

Notes:

1.  For the mating of the viper with the moray eel, see Pliny, Natural History 9.39.76; Aelian, De natura animalium 1.50; 9.66. The viper spits out the poison in order to be gentle and safe for the union.


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