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Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O4v p216]

Abies.

The fir tree

Apta fretis abies in montibus editur altis:
Est & in adversis maxima commoditas.[1]

The fir tree that is fit to sail the sea grows high up on the hills. Even in hard circumstances, there is great advantage to be found.

Notes:

1.  This is because it grows strong by withstanding the gales and harsh weather. Contrast Anthologia Graeca, 9.30ff, 105, and the much-translated 376 for an opposing view of the fir tree: “how can the fir, storm-tossed while growing on land, resist the gales at sea?” 9.31 was translated by Alciato (Selecta epigrammata, p. 98).


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Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R3r p261]

L’hierre.[1]

L’hierre est un">ung arbre en verdeur triumphant,
Duquel Bacchus feit don à Cisse enfant,[2]
Errant gravit: ha grains d’or en couleur,
Verd par dedans, tout le reste ha palleur.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R3v p262] Poetes doncq’, en ont les chefz couvers,[3]
Palles d’estude: en honneur tousjours verdz.

Les Poetes se coronnent de Laurier
& de L’hierre, qui tousjours verdoye
par dedans, par dehors est palle, & por
te bayes de couleur d’or, pour enseigne
que ilz sont palles d’estude par dehors,
& dedans leurs escriptz tousjours re-
verdissans par eternel honneur, pre-
cieux & illustres comme l’or.

Notes:

1.  The woodcut here is a fairly close, laterally inverted, copy of that used in the 1549 French edition.

2.  For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

3.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


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