Single Emblem View

Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O7r p221]

Malus medica.

The citron

Aurea sunt Veneris poma haec: iucundus amaror
Indicat, est Graecis sic γλυκυπίκρος amor.[1]

These golden fruits belong to Venus: the sweet bitterness tells us that. Even so is love glukupikros for the Greeks.

Notes:

1.  γλυκύπικρος, ‘bitter-sweet’, a concept often applied to Love in Hellenistic epigrams. See Emblem 111 ([A51a111]).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

  • Europeans (with NAME) [32B311(GREEKS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Pleasure, Enjoyment, Joy; 'Allegrezza', 'Allegrezza da le medaglie', 'Allegrezza, letitia e giubilo', 'Diletto', 'Piacere', 'Piacere honesto' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56B1(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Bitterness; 'Amaritudine' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56BB11(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • attributes of Venus (with NAME) [92C48(ORANGE)] Search | Browse Iconclass

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O3v p214]

Quercus.

The Oak

Grata Iovi est quercus, qui nos servatque, fovetque,
Servanti civem querna corona datur.[1]
aliud.
Glande aluit veteres,[2] sola nunc proficit umbra,
Sic quoque sic arbos officiosa Iovis.

The oak is pleasing to Jove who preserves and cherishes us. A crown of oak is given to one who preserves a fellow-citizen.
Other.
The oak fed men of old with its acorns. Now it benefits us only with its shade. In this way too the tree of Jove does us service.

Notes:

1.  ‘a crown of oak’, awarded for saving the life of a fellow-soldier; see Pliny, Natural History, 16.3.7.

2.  For the ancient belief that early man fed on acorns see e.g. Lucretius, De Rerum natura, 5.939; Vergil, Georgics, 1.7; Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.106.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions