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Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

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Morus.

The mulberry

Serior at Morus nunquàm nisi frigore lapso
Germinat:[1] & sapiens nomina falsa[2] gerit.

On the other hand, the mulberry is late, and never until the frost is past does it shoot; though wise, it bears a false name.

Notes:

1.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.25.102: “the mulberry is the last of domesticated trees to shoot, and only does so when the frosts are over; for that reason it is called the wisest of trees”.

2.  nomina falsa, ‘a false name’, reference to a supposed ‘etymology by opposites’: Latin morus ‘mulberry’ was equated with Greek μῶρος ‘fool’, but the tree was considered wise: see note 1.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc8v f284v]

Amygdalus.

The almond

Emblema ccviii.

Cur properans foliis praemittis amygdale flores?
Odi pupillos praecocis ingenii.[1]

Almond tree, why are you in such a hurry to put out flowers before your leaves? I hate precocious pupils.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc9r f285r]

AMygdalus citissimè floret, tardissimè fructum
profert, Plinius li. 16. cap. 25. Ita praecocia illa inge-
nia quae habent praeclaram quandam indolem, vix aut
certè serò admodum perveniunt ad frugem, ait
Fabius lib. 1. cap. 3.

L’Amandier.

L’Amandier se haste à florir,
Mais son fruit vient tard à meurir:
Ces esprits qui si tost se hastent,
Ne durent point, ains tost se gastent.

L’Amandier fleurit bien tost, mais rap-
porte son fruit tard, comme dit Pline li-
vre 16. chap. 25. Ainsi ces esprits si hastifs &
prompts, qui ont une grand’ montre du com-
mencement, ne viennent à perfection qu’à
grande difficulté ou fort tard, ainsi que par-
le Quintilian livre I. chap. 3.

Notes:

1.  See Quintilian (Fabius Quintilianus), Institutio oratoria, 1.3.3: “the precocious type of intellect never easily comes to fruition”.


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