Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[c5r p41]

Ex arduis perpetuum
nomen.

Lasting renown won through tribulation

XXIII.

Crediderat platani ramis sua pignora passer,
Et bene, ni saevo visa dracone forent.
Glutiit hic pullos omnes, miseramque parentem
Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[c5v p42]Saxeus, & tali dignus obire nece.
Haec, nisi mentitur Calchas, monumenta laboris
Sunt longi, cuius fama perennis eat.[1]

A sparrow had entrusted her young to the branches of a plane-tree, and all would have been well, if they had not been observed by a merciless snake. This creature devoured all the chicks and the hapless parent too, a stony-hearted beast, turned to stone as it deserved. Unless Calchas speaks falsely, these are the tokens of long toil, the fame of which will go on through all the years.

COMMENTARIA.

Calchas Graecus augur valde celebris (qui
cum divinandi certamine ŗ Mopso victus,
prae moestitia periit, ut festivŤ Leonicus de
varia historia lib. 3. cap. 63.[2]) Is unŗ cum Graecis
ducibus ad expeditionem Troiae profectus est.
Accidit autem ut fortŤ dum omnes rei divi-
nae auspicatissimo rerum gerendarum initio in-
tenti essent. Draco quidam ingens prodigiosŤ
apparuisset, qui arborem platanum ascen-
dens, ibique nido novem pullis reperto, omnes
subitÚ, denique etiam matrem crudeliter de-
voravit. Consultus igitus Calchas quid hoc
sibi vellet vaticinatus fuit, Graecos urbem il-
lam Troianam, per novem continuos annos
obsessuros non sine maximis laboribus, de-
cimo verÚ anno victores existuros, totamque
Troiam incendio penitus devastaturos, (quod
& factum fuit) ut habetur apud Homerum.
Et eius vitae interpretatione. Signifi-
catur ex difficilibus diuturnisque
laboribus tandem maximam
laudem, memoriamque
perpetuam pro-
silire.

Notes:

1.See Homer, Iliad 2.299ff. for this portent which occurred at Aulis, where the Greek fleet was waiting to sail for Troy. Calchas the seer interpreted the eating of the eight chicks and their mother, followed by the death of the snake, as foretelling the nine-year battle for Troy, followed by success.

2.Nicolaus Leonicus Thomaeus (Niccolo Leonico Tomeo), c. 1456-1531, professor of Greek and Latin at Padua, philosopher and humanist.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[B6v p28]

Obdurandum adversus urgentia.

Stand firm against pressure

Nititur in pondus palma, & consurgit in arcum,
Quo magis & premitur hoc mage tollit onus.[1]
Fert & odoratas bellaria dulcia glandes,[2]
Queis mensas inter primus habetur honos.
I puer, & reptans ramis has collige, mentis
Qui constantis erit, praemia digna feret.

The wood of the palm-tree counteracts a weight and rises up into an arch. The heavier the burden pressing it down, the more it lifts it up. The palm-tree also bears fragrant dates, sweet dainties much valued when served at table. Go, boy, edge your way along the branches and gather them. The man who shows a resolute spirit will receive an appropriate reward.

Notes:

1.The reaction of palm to a heavy weight is mentioned in various ancient sources, e.g. Pliny, Natural History 16.81.223; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 3.6. See also Erasmus, Parabolae p.263. It probably refers to a plank of palm-wood, rather than a branch of the living tree. A similar image is used in La Perriere, Morosophie, no. 83 ([FLPb083]).

2.See Erasmus, Parabolae p.241: ‘the palm-tree, having bark with knife-sharp edges, is difficult to climb, but it bears delicious fruit’.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top