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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [f7v p94]

Parem delinquentis & suasoris cul-
pam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

LV.

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica victrix
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Queis ille excusat, qud nec sit strenuus armis.
Ullius aut saevo laeserit ense latus.
Huic illi, Quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[1]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

COMMENTARIA.

Victores in bello tubicinem adversae partis
ceperant, quem cm vinctum uti hostem tene
rent & fort plecterent ille se excusationibus
defendere conabatur, dicens neminem laesisse
nec contra quenquam pugnasse, nec etiam
unquam aliis armis praeter solam tubam usum
fuisse. Cui illi vicissim dixerunt, O timide, hoc
Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [f8r p95]magis peccasti, caeteros nanque milites tuhae [=tubae] so-
no ad arma incitasti. Pariter apud Aesopum
in fabula de Buccinatore. Ostenditur non mi-
nus eos qui ad delicta alios instigant & per-
suadent, qum ipsosmet delinquentes punien
dos esse. Hoc ipsum etiam iure cavetur, & in
Lege Si quis servo. Codex de furtis.[2]

Notes:

1. This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.

2. The Codex or Code (usually CJ) is part of Justinian’s Corpus Iuris Civilis. See O. F. Robinson, Sources of Roman Law (London: Routledge, 1997).


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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [H7v p126]

Aliquid mali propter vicinum malum.[1]

Misfortune caused by a bad neighbour

LVIII.

Raptabat torrens ollas, quarum una metallo,
Altera erat figuli terrea facta manu.
Hanc igitur rogat illa, velit sibi proxima ferri,
Iuncta ut praecipites utraque sistat aquas:
Cui lutea, Haud nobis tua sunt commercia curae,
Ne mihi proximitas haec mala multa ferat.
Nam seu te nobis, seu nos tibi conferat unda,
Ipsa ego te fragilis sospite sola terar.

A stream was carrying along two pots, one of which was made of metal, the other formed by the potter’s hand of clay. The metal pot asked the clay one whether it would like to float along close beside it, so that each of them, by uniting with the other, could resist the rushing waters. The clay pot replied: The arrangement you propose does not appeal to me. I am afraid that such proximity will bring many misfortunes upon me. For whether the wave washes you against me or me against you, I only, being breakable, will be shattered, while you remain unharmed.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [H8r p127]

Voisinage peult rendre mal.

LVIII.

La riviere portoit deux potz,
L’ung de terre, l’autre de cuyvre:
Qui dit au foible telz propos:
Viens pres moy ton chemin poursuyvre.
Je ne te veulx (dit l’autre) suyvre,
Ny aulcunement approcher:
Car tost me garderoys de vivre,
Si me laissoys a toy toucher.

Notes:

1. See Avianus, Fables 11; Erasmus, Adagia 32, Aliquid mali propter vicinum malum.


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