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In formosam fato peremptam.[1]

On a beautiful woman, dead before her time

LXVI.

Cur puerum Mors ausa dolis es carpere Amorem,
Tela tua ut iaceret, dum propria esse putat?

Death, why did you so audaciously and with evil intent steal from the boy Love? - So that he might shoot your weapons, thinking them his own

COMMENTARIA.

Mors invida blandum deceperat cupidinem,
sibi enim dormienti aurea tela abstulerat, &
mortifera eius pharetris imposuit, quibus ne-
scius Cupido formosam percusserat puel-
lam, quae protinus ob iniuriam sibi illatam
contra mortis technas exclamat, O iniqua
mors quare amorem puerum fefellisti, qui
tuis sagittis truculenter me miseram transfixit
suas amabiles esse credens? Sic plerunque mala
fortuna, prosperam illam fallit & superat.

Notes:

1. The iconography of the emblems ‘De morte et amore’ and ‘In formosam fato praereptam’ is confused in many editions.


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IN TEMERARIOS.

The reckless

Emblema. 56.

Aspicis aurigam currus Phaetonta[1] paterni.
Ignivomos ausum flectere Solis equos.
Maxima qui postquam terris incendia sparsit,
Est temer insesso lapsus[2] ab axe miser.
Sic plerique rotis fortunae ad sidera Reges
Evecti ambitio quos iuvenilis agit.
Post magnum [=magnam] humani generis clademque, suamque,
Cunctorum paenas denique dant scelerum.

You see here Phaethon, driving his father's chariot, and daring to guide the fire-breathing steeds of the Sun. After spreading great conflagrations over the earth, the wretched boy fell from the car he had so rashly mounted. - Even so, the majority of kings are borne up to heaven on the wheels of Fortune, driven by youth's ambition. After they have brought great disaster on the human race and themselves, they finally pay the penalty for all their crimes.

Notes:

1. Phaethon, the son of Apollo, the sun-god. The myth referred to here is told in Ovid, Metamorphoses 1.748 - 2.349. Both Phaethon and Icarus (see [A15a102]) are types of those who aim too high and do not recognise their proper sphere.

2. Corrected from the Errata.


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