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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n1r p193]

Male parta male dila-
buntur.[1]

Ill gotten, ill spent

XIII.

Miluus edax,[2] nimiae quem nausea torserat escae,
Hei mihi mater ait viscera ab ore fluunt.
Illa autem, quid fles? cur haec tua viscera credas,
Qui rapto vivens sola aliena vomis?

A voracious kite, which had eaten too much, was racked with vomiting. ‘O dear, mother’, it said, ‘entrails are pouring out of my mouth.’ She however replied: ‘What are you crying about? Why do you think these are your entrails? You live by plunder and vomit only what belongs to others.’

Notes:

1.  The title is proverbial. See Cicero, Philippics, 2.65.

2.  ‘A voracious kite’. The kite was a figure of greed and extortion.


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    Single Emblem View

    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [p123]

    Del danno altrui altrui utilita.

    From the harm done to one person comes advantage to another.


    Il leon, e’l cinghiale a stretta guerra
    Venner, con l’unghia l’un, l’altro col dente:
    Sopravien, mira, e ben sa l’avoltore.
    Ch’a se fia preda, e gloria al vincitore,


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