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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [n4r p199]

Cupressus.

The Cypress

XXXI.

Indicat effigies metae, nomenque cupressi
Tractandos parili conditione suos.[1]
ALIUD,
Funesta est arbor, procerum monumenta cupressus,
Quale apium plebis, comere fronde solet. [2]
ALIUD.
Pulchra coma est, pulchro digestaeque ordine frondes,
Sed fructus nullos haec coma pulchra gerit.[3]

The cone-shaped form and the name ‘cypress’ indicate that one’s people should be dealt with on equal terms.
Other.
The cypress is a funereal tree. Its branches usually adorn the memorials of leading men as parsley-stems adorn those of humble people.
Other.
The foliage is beautiful, and the leaves all arranged in neat order, but this beautiful foliage bears no fruit.

Notes:

1. This refers to the supposed etymology, Greek κύειν and πάρισος ‘bear’,‘equal’.

2. See Pliny, Natural History, 20.44.113 for the use of parsley at funeral meals.

3. See Erasmus, Adagia, 4210 (Cyparissi fructus).


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    Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [R%r p265]

    Le Morier.[1]

    Le Morier sage, & en Grec mal nomm[2]
    Ne fleurit point que L’hyver consomm.[3]

    Consomm, & finy L’hyver, lors le
    Morier, apres les aultres grandz arbres,
    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [R5v p266] commence jecter ses fleurs, & germes, hors
    les dangiers des froidures, & geles, Ainsi
    faict le sage, qui ne s’advance point en tous
    affaires, avant qu’il soit temps, & ne hazarde
    rien, dangier, mais au plus seur. Parquoy,
    il est nomm en Grec Moros par sens cont-
    raire, Car Μωρος en Grec est dire fol: &
    il est sage, qui ne gecte point sa fleur, & son
    fruyct, que tout le peril d’hyver ne soit con
    somm.

    Notes:

    1. The woodcut here is a fairly close, laterally inverted, copy of that used in the 1549 French edition.

    2. Reference to a supposed ‘etymology by opposites’: Latin morus ‘mulberry’ was equated with Greek μῶρος ‘fool’, but the tree was considered wise: see note 2.

    3. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.25.102: ‘the mulberry is the last of domesticated trees to shoot, and only does so when the frosts are over; for that reason it is called the wisest of trees’.


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