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Buxus.

The box-tree

XXXIX.

Perpetuò viridis, crispoque cacumine buxus.
Unde est disparibus fistula facta modis,[1]
Deliciis apta est teneris, & amantibus arbor.
Pallor inest illi, pallet & omnis amans. [2]

The box-tree is evergreen, with crinkly shoots. From it was made the pipe with its variously pitched notes. It is a tree appropriate to tender delights and to lovers. Box-wood is pale and so is every lover.

Notes:

1.  For pipes of boxwood, see e.g. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.30.

2.  pallet et omnis amans, ‘pale...is every lover’. The lover should affect pallor and emaciation, as these will soften the lady’s heart; see Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.729ff.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Hhh6r p859]

    Picea.

    The spruce tree

    EMBLEMA CCIII.

    At Picea emittat nullos quòd stirpe stolones,
    Illius est index, qui sine prole perit.

    But the spruce, because it sends up no shoots from its stock, is a symbol of the man who dies without progeny.


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