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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n8r p207]

Luxuria.

Licentiousness

LXI.

Eruca capripes redimitus tempora Faunus
Immodicae Veneris symbola certa refert.
Est eruca salax,[1] indexque libidinis hircus,
Et satyri nymphas semper amare solent.[2]

Goat-footed Faunus, his temples garlanded with the herb rocket, provides unmistakable symbols of desire without restraint. Rocket stimulates desire, the goat is a symbol of sexual appetite, and the satyrs are always lusting after the nymphs.

Notes:

1.  Rocket is described as herba salax at Ovid, Ars amatoria, 4.22. Pliny, Natural History, 10.83.182 and 19.44.154, lists it as an aphrodisiac.

2.  Satyrs were creatures half-human, half-goat in form, like Faunus, and Pan with whom Faunus was often identified. See emblems 277 ([A56a277]), and 105 ([A56a105]). Cf. Horace, Odes, 3.18.1: ‘Faunus, you who lust after the fleeing nymphs’.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O5v p218]

    La soverbia.

    Ottava rhima.

    Ves de una estatua estatua fabricada
    Y de otro marmor un marmor sacado.
    Esta es la Niobe[1] que ser comparada
    Con la Latona quiso por su hado.[2]
    Vicio es de la muger la levantada
    Soverbia, y por la piedra es declarado
    Ser la muger de tan duro sentido
    Qual en la dura piedra es conosçido.

    Notes:

    1.  According to the best-known story of her fate, Niobe was turned to stone. For the statue of Niobe by Praxiteles, see Ausonius, Epigrams, 63.2 and Anthologia Graeca, 16.130, a much translated epigram, which seems to have been in Alciato’s thoughts here.

    2.  Niobe in her pride boasted that having 12 (or 14) children, she was superior to Lato with just two, i.e. Apollo and Diana. These gods in revenge slew all her children and in her grief Niobe hardened into a rock; see Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.165ff. See further, Erasmus, Adagia, 2233, Niobes mala.


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