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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [o2r p211]

Vino prudentiam augeri.[1]

Wisdom increased by wine.

LXXIIII [=75] .

Haec Bacchus pater, & Pallas communiter ambo
Templa tenent: soboles utraque vera Iovis:
Haec caput, ille femur solvit:[2] huic usus olivi
Debitus, invenit primus at ille merum.
Iunguntur merito. quòd si qui abstemius odit
Vina, deae nullum sentiet auxilium.

This temple Father Bacchus and Pallas both possess in common, each of them the true off-spring of Jove: she split Jove’s head, he his thigh. To her we owe the use of the olive; but he first discovered wine. They are rightly joined together, because if anyone in abstinence hates wine, he will know no help from the goddess.

Notes:

1.  This emblem uses material from Anthologia Graeca, 16.183, concerning a statue of Bacchus beside one of Pallas Athene.

2.  Haec caput, ille femur solvit, ‘she split Jove’s head, he his thigh’. For the birth of Pallas Athene from the head of Jove and of Bacchus from his thigh, see emblems 1 ([A56a001]), and 25 ([A56a025]). Pallas is the virgin goddess, patroness of intellectual pursuits, who presented Athens with the gift of the olive tree. Bacchus discovered the vine during his wanderings about the earth and taught men its use. He also introduced various other features of civilisation.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [o1v p210]

    Temeritas.

    Rashness

    LXXII [=73] .

    In praeceps rapitur, frustra quoque tendit habenas
    Auriga, effraeni quem vehit oris equus.
    Haud facile huic credas, ratio quem nulla gubernat
    Et temerè proprio ducitur arbitrio.[1]

    A driver pulled by a horse whose mouth does not respond to the bridle is rushed headlong and in vain drags on the reins. You cannot readily trust one whom no reason governs, one who is heedlessly taken where his fancy goes.

    Notes:

    1.  In general see Plato’s image of the chariot of the soul, Phaedrus, 246, as indicated in some commentaries.


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