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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D6v p60]

Pour celuy qui ne scait flater.

Veulx tu savoir, Pourquoy c’est que Thessaille
D’ung Duc, à aultre, ainsi souvent tressaille?
(C’est qu’a flater elle n’ha point apprins ce,
Lequel vice est en toute court de Prince,
Mais comme un noble, & bon cheval, met bas
Son chevaucheur qui regir ne scait pas.)[1]
Point toutesfoys cruel ne soit le maistre,
Ung mors plus dur pour vengence doibt estre.

Les rebellions populaires viennent par
mauvaise administration des Princes.

Notes:

1.  See Plato, Politicus 261d for the image of the ruler as supervisor of a stud of horses.


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  • virtues of the ruler [44B10] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • family of a ruler, and court [44B15] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Strength, Power; 'Fortezza', 'Fortezza d'Animo e di corpo', 'Fortezza del corpo congiunta con la generosità dell'animo', 'Fortezza & valore del corpo congiunto con la prudenza & virtù del animo', 'Forza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54A7(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Sincerity; 'Purità et Sincerità d'animo', 'Sincerità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57A612(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Flattery; 'Adulatione' (Ripa) [57AA6121] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Revenge, Requital, Retaliation; 'Vendetta' (Ripa) [57AA741] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Praise, Approbation, Approval; 'Lode' (Ripa) [57B1] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(THESSALY)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Section: FORTITUDO (Fortitude). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C6r p43]

Obdurandum adversus
urgentia.

Stand firm against pressure.

Nititur in pondus palma, & consurgit in arcum,
Quò magis & premitur, hoc mage tollit onus:[1]
Fert & odoratas bellaria dulcia glandes,[2]
Queis mensas inter primus habetur honos.
I puer, & reptans ramis has collige, mentis
Qui constantis erit, praemia digna feret.

The wood of the palm-tree counteracts a weight and rises up into an arch. The heavier the burden pressing it down, the more it lifts it up. The palm-tree also bears fragrant dates, sweet dainties much valued when served at table. Go, boy, edge your way along the branches and gather them. The man who shows a resolute spirit will receive an appropriate reward.

Notes:

1.  The reaction of palm to a heavy weight is mentioned in various ancient sources, e.g. Pliny, Natural History 16.81.223; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 3.6. See also Erasmus, Parabolae p.263. It probably refers to a plank of palm-wood, rather than a branch of the living tree.

2.  See Erasmus, Parabolae p.241: ‘the palm-tree, having bark with knife-sharp edges, is difficult to climb, but it bears delicious fruit’.


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