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Section: DESLOYAULTE. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E6r p75]

Trahison contre les siens.

Cane privée, & de gris emplumée
Aller, venir aux siens accoustumée
Voyant voler les sauvages ensemble,
Et cacquetant, avec elles s’assemble,
Tant qu’aulx filletz tenduz elle les dresse.
Prinses, font cry, Lors se taist la traistresse,
Et se pollut du sang de sa semblable,
Mortelle aux siens, aux aultres proufitable.[1]

Similitude des Canes domesticques, attirantes les
saulvages es filetz: aulx traistres Ganelons, qui
rendent ceulx de leur propre nation, gent, pais,
maison & sang, entre les mains de leurs enne-
mis mortelz.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Aesop, Fables, 282, where the decoy birds are pigeons.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E4v p72]

    In adulatores.

    Flatterers

    EMBLEMA LIII.

    Semper hiat, semper tenuem, qua vescitur, auram,
    Reciprocat Chamaeleon[1]:
    Et mutat faciem, varios sumitque colores,
    Praeter rubrum vel candidum.[2]
    Sic & adulator populari vescitur aura,[3]
    Hiansque cuncta devorat:
    Et solùm mores imitatur Principis atros;
    Albi & pudici nescius.

    The Chameleon is always breathing in and out with open mouth the bodiless air on which it feeds; it changes its appearance and takes on various colours, except for red and white. - Even so the flatterer feeds on the wind of popular approval and gulps down all with open mouth. He imitates only the black features of the prince, knowing nothing of the white and pure.

    Notes:

    1.  This creature was supposed to feed only on air, keeping its mouth wide open to suck it in. See Pliny, Natural History 8.51.122. For the chameleon cf. Erasmus, Parabolae pp.144, 241, 252.

    2.  ‘except for red and white’. See Pliny, ib.

    3.  ‘the wind of popular approval’. This is a common metaphor in Latin, e.g. Horace, Odes 3.2.20, ‘at the behest of the wind of popular approval.’


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