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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K6v p156]

Rieude [=Rien de] reste.

Cela restoit à noz malheurs meschants,
Que les langoustz gastassent tous nos champs.[1]
Veuz les avons en armées plus grandes,
Que d’Atylas, ou de Xerxes les bandes:[2]
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K7r p157] Tout ha mangé foin, mil bled, celle peste.
Espoir perdu, rien que souhaict ne reste.

L’une des dix playes d’AEgypte furent les
Langoustes, consummantes tout fruict, fleur,
& semence sur terre, & telle fut en Lombar-
die
au temps que cest Embleme fut escript,
qui vola jusques en Provence, puys se jecta.
en mer. Sur quoy fut cecy escript, signifi-
ant que à toute reste perdue, à la chance, ou au
flux ne reste sinon le souhaict, ou le desespoir.

Notes:

1.  Referring to a plague of locusts in North Italy in 1541/2 (as in the commentary).

2.  Attila the Hun and Xerxes, King of Persia, were leaders who invaded the Roman Empire and Greece with vast armies in mid fifth century AD and 480 BC respectively. Xerxes’ invasion and Attila’s first invasion both came from the east.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Qq8v f312v as 311]

    MALE PARTA MALE DILA-
    buntur.[1]

    Ill gotten, ill spent

    Emblema 127

    Miluus edax,[2] nimiae quem nausea torserat escae,
    Hei mihi mater, ait, viscera ab ore fluunt.
    Illa autem, quid fles? cur haec tua viscera credas,
    Qui rapto vivens sola aliena vomis?

    A voracious kite, which had eaten too much, was racked with vomiting. ‘O dear, mother’, it said, ‘entrails are pouring out of my mouth.’ She however replied: ‘What are you crying about? Why do you think these are your entrails? You live by plunder and vomit only what belongs to others.’

    Notes:

    1.  The title is proverbial. See Cicero, Philippics, 2.65.

    2.  ‘A voracious kite’. The kite was a figure of greed and extortion.


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    • Gluttony, Intemperance, 'Gula'; 'Gola', 'Ingordigia', 'Ingordigia overo Avidità', 'Voracità' (Ripa) ~ personification of one of the Seven Deadly Sins [11N35] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • animal 'educating the young', playing with young [25F(+422)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • theft [44G544] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Bad, Evil, Wrong (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52B5112(+4):55A1(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Squandering, Extravagance, Prodigality, Waste; 'Prodigalità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [55C11(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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