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Section: LA REPUBLICQUE. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M5r p185]

La Republicque delivrée.[1]

Caesar occis, la liberté vengée
Par le Duc Brut fut monnoie forgée,
Ou une dague, & ung bonnet estoient,
Tel que les serfz affranchiz le portoient.[2]

Brut Capitaine de la republicque Rommaine, pour memoi-
re d’avoir restitué la liberté oppressée par la domination de
Caesar, par luy occis, feit forger monnoie à la marque d’une
dague, denotant l’occision de Caesar, & d’ung bonnet, signifiant
la liberté de la Republicque. Car les libertins. (C’est à dire serfz
affranchiz) quand ilz sortoient de servitude, & entroient en li-
berté: Ilz prenoient le bonnet, Comme encore au jourdhuy font les
Maistres es arts à Paris, passans de scholasticque discipline, à mai-
trise, & laissans la ceincture enseigne de servitude, & subjection.

Notes:

1.  In the 1549 French edition, this emblem has no woodcut.

2.  Julius Caesar, who had become in effect the sole ruler of Rome, was assassinated on the Ides of March in 44 BC by Marcus and Decimus Brutus, Cassius and other conspirators. Alciato describes the well-known coin-type celebrating the restoration of republican government issued by Brutus after the murder. This bears the legend EID.MAR. (The Ides of March) across the lower section; above this, occupying the upper two thirds of the coin face, are two upright daggers with a cap of liberty between. Alciato had presumably seen or owned such a coin. He wrote a short treatise on ancient coins.


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  • republic; 'Governo della republica' (Ripa) [44B03] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • freedom ~ slavery [46A183] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Freedom, Liberty; 'Libertৠ(Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [51E11(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(BRUTUS, M.)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • death of Caesar, i.e. the murder of Caesar: he is slain in the Senate at the foot of Pompey's statue, exclaiming 'et tu Brute' [98B(CAESAR)68] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O2v p212]

In vitam humanam.

On human life

XCVI.

Plus solito humanae nunc defle incommoda vitae,
Heraclite, scatet pluribus illa malis.
Tu rursus, si quando aliàs, extolle cachinnum
Democrite, illa magis ludicra facta fuit.
Intereà haec cernens meditor, qua denique tecum
Fine fleam, aut tecum quomodò splene iocer.[1]

Weep now, Heraclitus, even more than you did, for the ills of human life. It teems with far more woes. And you, Democritus, if ever you laughed before, raise your cackle now. Life has become more of a joke. Meanwhile, seeing all this, I consider just how far I can weep with you, how laugh bitterly with you.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O3r p213]

Das wesen diser welt.

XCVI.

O Heraclite, mehr dan nye
Bewayn yetz die menschlichen sach,
In den so vil truebsal und mhye:
Democrite du spott und lach
Der narrheyt, so yetz ist zwifach
Bey allen stenden in gemayn:
Die weyl wil ich im sinnen nach,
Ob ich mit ewch lach, oder wayn.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.148. For Heraclitus, cf. [A50a016]. For the contrast between the despairing tears of Heraclitus (who withdrew from human society) and the sardonic laughter of Democritus when faced with the folly of men, see, among many sources, e.g. Juvenal, Satires 10, 28ff.


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