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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [M7v p190]

Avec les Morts ne fault lucter.[1]

Prosopopoeie.

Hector[2] mourant par le coup d’Achilles
(Apres avoir tant de Grecz reculles)
Ne peut tenir sa voix, quand ilz saultoient,
Et les lyens ses piedz apprestoient.
Tirez (dist il). Lievres qui craignent fort
Tirent ainsi la barbe au Lyon mort.[3]

C’est la Nature des Pusillanimes, insulter
aulx fors vincuz: lesquelz en leurs for-
ces ne heussent os regarder.

Notes:

1. Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2. Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

3. The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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Section: VITA (Life). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [L3r p165]

Are quandoque salutem
redimendam.

Sometimes money must be spent to purchase safety

Et pedibus segnis, tumida & propendulus alvo,
Hac tamen insidias effugit arte fiber.
Mordicus ipse sibi medicata virilia vellit.
Atque abicit, sese gnarus ob illa peti.
Huius ab exemplo disces non parcere rebus,
Et vitam ut redimas, hostibus aera dare.[1]

Though slow of foot and with swollen belly hanging down, the beaver nonetheless escapes the ambush by this trick: it tears off with its teeth its testicles, which are full of a medicinal substance, and throws them aside, knowing that it is hunted for their sake. - From this creature’s example you will learn not to spare material things, and to give money to the enemy to buy your life.

Notes:

1. This is based on Aesop, Fables 153, where the same moral is drawn. For the information about the beaver, see Pliny, Natural History 8.47.109; Isidore, Etymologiae (Origines) 12.2.21.


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