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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N3v p198]

Hoirie d’ung riche homme.[1]

D’ung costé sont les Grecz, d’aultre Troyans,
Soubz faulx harnois Patrocle distraians [=distrayans] .[2]
Les armes prent Hector, les Grecz le corps.
Tel jeu se faict: quand les riches sont morts.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N4r p199] Proces en vient: mais L’heritier tout part,
Et aulx corbeaulx, & vaultours laisse part.[3]

Patrocle, souverain amy d’Achilles, fut
par Hector occis, & despoillé des armes
excellentes d’icelluy Achilles, & la cha-
roigne laissée aulx Grecz, & aulx oy-
seaulx: Ainsi d’ung riche homme mort,
couvert de [=des] faulx biens de Fortune: (qui
ne sont propres à luy) L’heritier en prent
la despoille, & succession, les plaidoieurs
quelque portion, les Prestres le corps
avec la funeraille.

Notes:

1.  In the 1549 French edition, this emblem has no woodcut.

2.  For the death of Patroclus, see Homer, Iliad, 16.784ff. He borrowed Achilles’ armour to fight the Trojans when Achilles refused, and was killed by Hector, who took the armour.

3.  ‘Vulture’ was a term used to refer to people who hang round rich persons, hoping for a legacy See Erasmus, Adagia, 614 (Si vultur es, cadaver exspecta).


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [A6r]

AMICITIA ETIAM POST MOR-
TEM DURANS.[1]

Friendship lasting even beyond death

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [A6v]

Arentem senio, nudam quoque frontibus [=frondibus] ulmum,
Complexa est viridi vitis opaca coma.[2]
Agnoscitque vices naturae & grata parenti.
Officii reddit mutua iura suo.
Exemploque monet, tales non [=nos] quaerere amicos,
Quos neque disiungat foedere summa dies.

A vine shady with green foliage embraced an elm tree that was dried up with age and bare of leaves. The vine recognises the changes wrought by nature and, ever grateful, renders to the one that reared it the duty it owes in return. By the example it offers, the vine tells us to seek friends of such a sort that not even our final day will uncouple them from the bond of friendship.

Notes:

1.  See Erasmus’ famous variations on this theme in De copia (CWE 24. pp. 354-64).

2.  In ancient Italy young vines were often supported by elm trees. See Vergil, Georgics 1.2.


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